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Wilba - Answered a Question by Fletcher (16 Jan 09 14:28)

You can sign a Waiver for the drinks issue & their seapass card is swiped accordingly so there is no embarrassment when purchasing drinks. The next is from the RCI website, so you are OK with the cabin issue. Royal Caribbean International : No guest under the age of twenty-one (21) will be reserved in a stateroom unless accompanied by an adult twenty-one (21) years of age, or older. This age limit will be waived for minor children sailing with their parents or guardians in adjacent staterooms or under-aged married couples.

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Bradbury - Answered a Question by Fletcher (16 Jan 09 14:32)

I have got this inforamtion from RCI: Stateroom reservations will not be accepted for guests under the age of twenty-one unless accompanied by an adult (twenty-one (21) years of age or older). This age limit will be waived for minors sailing with their parents or guardians in adjacent staterooms. The minimum drinking age for all alcoholic beverages on all Royal Caribbean International ships is 21. However, on cruises departing from European and South American countries, where the legal drinking age is typically lower than 21, a parent who is sailing with his or her son(s) and/or daughter(s) who is (are) between the ages of 18 and 20 may sign a waiver allowing the 18 to 20 year-old to consume alcoholic beverages. Hope this helps..... not sure how the drinks waiver applies as you are not the parent of both - you would have to check with RC Also Adults who are not the parent or legal guardian of a minor travelling with them must present an original notarised letter signed by the child's parent(s), authorising the adult to take the child on the specific cruise, supervise the child and allow emergency medical treatment to be administered. I dont know up to what ages this applies 16, 18 or 21??. You would need to either contact your cruise agent or RC direct.

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Setter - replied to Bradbury (16 Jan 09 18:03)

If you have the appropriate written and notarised authority from the parents you should be regarded as in loco parentis and thus as able to sign the drinks waiver for the 18 to 20 year old who is not your child .Cynthia.

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BLYTH - Answered a Question by Fletcher (16 Jan 09 15:27)

As far as a drink is concerned OK for Med would not be if you were in the Caribbean on a cruise as it is an American cruise ship, but I think you do have to authorise and put a limit per day. I thought sharing was OK if you were in adjoining staterooms. The guardian issue is more complicated as a USA ship they will need if one arises to know you have the full authority of all the parents and the form has to be signed in the presence of a solicitor; JP or Commisionwr of Oaths, I think this does not apply if they are over 18 years of age again as you are in European waters but you need to carefully check this line out with RCI.

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Simpson - Answered a Question by Fletcher (16 Jan 09 15:42)

Just need to use your loaf a little, Book your son in with you in your cabin and book his mate in with your husband then when on ship you go with!!!!!!!! Yes I think you got it. We never had any problems with RCI in the MED although I thought I was going to have words with a nosey American who was pulling his face at my son who is 19 and was in the bar with me.

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Wilba - replied to Simpson (16 Jan 09 15:55)

Whether they book his mate with the husband or not, doe's not absolve them from The 'notorisation' issue. The rules state the lads may have an adjacent cabin providing the parents or guardian are next door.

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Walsh - replied to Wilba (17 Jan 09 00:12)

Rules Rules Rules... for goodness sake its a ship and supposedly a holiday. We did the same as Simpson no problem and our 'kids' were 18 and 19 not little children .

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Parker - Answered a Question by Fletcher (16 Jan 09 16:38)

Myelf and my husband travelled with my 14 yr old daughter and her friend round the Med Aug 08 with RCL and we booked into a seperate cabin by the travel agent (RCL didnt query the ages when they did the phone bit) and they were in an insude cabin on the side right next to us - not ajoining either. We had a notiary done as advised and this was not looked at once not even when we booked in at the port. Upon arrival back i did ring RCL and state that it had not been requested and they said it must have been an oversight with the booking in clerk. On princess my son aged 17 and his friend also had their own cabin - no questions asked. May be worth trying it when you book and see if RCL come back to you when you have the final confirmation.

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Simpson - replied to Parker (16 Jan 09 19:19)

Agree with you, I think some make to much out of things. Get on with it and have a good holiday.

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Rae - replied to Parker (16 Jan 09 22:37)

If the cabin was 'right next to us' then it was adjoining. I think you must mean 'not inter-connecting' and this is not a requirement, only 'adjoining'. These two terms are often confused.

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