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Paying a Penny to help NHS

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    #31
    Absolutely agree. I'd be very happy to pay more if I thought it would solve the problem.
    Originally posted by 1fifthavenue, birmingham View Post
    I'm sure many commentators have said that just throwing money at the NHS will not solve all of it's problems. Yes more funding would be a good thing, but perhaps they really do need to 'pause and evaluate' what is being delivered - scaling up current activites would just cause the same issues, but with perhaps shorter waiting times.

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      #32
      Totally agree, Annie. My daughter who works for the NHS has told plenty of such stories. A guy I know was advised to change his lifestyle and eating habits as he was at risk of diabetes. He didn't, and now has type 2 diabetes. Surprise, surprise.
      Originally posted by annie, Glasgow View Post
      Hi George

      I was about to post something similar and those forum members who work on the front line of the NHS will have a better feel for this than I do:

      How many GP visits or hospital appointments are for conditions related to poor lifestyle choices we choose to make?

      I have relatives who work or have worked in the NHS and their estimates are staggering.

      Annie

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        #33
        Originally posted by 1fifthavenue, birmingham View Post
        There certainly are efficiencies to be found in the NHS, and perhaps staff could be redeployed, although clearly there would be employee relations issues to take in to account.

        I attend the hospital every quarter and on my visit I'll see 3 nurses to start with to take my blood pressure and measure my weight - one of them is a Sister and notes the results - why this takes three I'm not sure.

        Then see a doctor to discuss general well being, then another nurse to take blood tests, before then seeing a pharmacist to get the prescription for my medication that I then pick up from the pharmacy, who provide the same advice as the pharmacist in the clinic.
        Why does it take a nurse and a Sister to take blood pressure - it is hardly requiring a medical professional to do that. A lot of people take their own pressure at home. A Healthcare Assistant is quite capable of not only taking blood pressure, but also once trained, taking bloods. I know of admin staff in GP surgeries being trained to take bloods in clinics. This is the type of waste that is so unnecessary. Nursing time is wasted, when they could be doing more important things which justifies their wages.

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          #34
          Originally posted by PeterM, Southwell View Post
          Totally agree, Annie. My daughter who works for the NHS has told plenty of such stories. A guy I know was advised to change his lifestyle and eating habits as he was at risk of diabetes. He didn't, and now has type 2 diabetes. Surprise, surprise.
          I am not surprised. It is said that Britain was healthier in times of rationing than it is today.

          Food for thought??

          Annie

          Comment


            #35
            Apparently, a penny on income tax would raise £6 billion. A drop in the bucket on a budget of £116.4 billion.

            NI is just part of income tax, (13.8% of earnings between £702 and £3,863 a month) but when you reach retirement age you no longer have to pay it. I have always said that it should be absorbed into the standard tax rates, but taking the age exemption away would be a good start.

            For those who grumble about impoverished pensioners who can barely afford their semi-annual cruise, it does not bite unless you earn enough, so those on state pensions or even a little more would not be affected.
            The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
            T Pratchett.

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              #36
              My doctors surgery has now "upgraded" its service so the ONLY way you can see a doctor is to go and queue before they open at 8:00am in the hope of getting an appointment. My wife was third in the queue at at 7:25 and finally saw a doctor (not one of her choice) at 9:30. No, that is not worth another penny on income tax.

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                #37
                Originally posted by zopadooper, skegness (2) View Post
                My doctors surgery has now "upgraded" its service so the ONLY way you can see a doctor is to go and queue before they open at 8:00am in the hope of getting an appointment. My wife was third in the queue at at 7:25 and finally saw a doctor (not one of her choice) at 9:30. No, that is not worth another penny on income tax.
                Ours used to do that, they have now changed it, and when you ring for an appointment a Doctor phones you back. They then decide if you get an appointment or not! .................................................. .............Carol

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                  #38
                  To make an appointment at our Doctors you used to have two choices, either you could queue outside the doctors waiting for them to open at 8/30am and make an appointment with receptionist, people would start queuing at 8am.

                  Or

                  You could ring at 8/30 hoping to get an appointment.

                  Now to save people queuing they open the phone lines at 8am, still do not open until 8/30am, whichever system they use the Doctors do not start seeing patients until 9am.

                  I had to make an appointment this week, I rang dead on 8am a recorded message told me Doctors was not open giving me an emergency no. I rang back immediately this time I was informed I was no 10 in a queue.

                  I waited until it was my turn, when I got through the receptionist ask me if my problem could be dealt with by a nurse etc, I informed her of my problem she informed me I should see the Doctor and an appointment was made for 10:20am, I was seen at 10:40am. I did notice that the waiting room was the emptiest I have ever seen it.

                  I was asked by the doctor if I had been taking any medication for the pain, told him only over the counter medication he did not offer me any other, but sent me for a Curvical Spine X Ray at our local hospital. Three people in front of me at XRay dept, when I came out it was packed. Have to wait 10 days for XRay results.
                  Delboy


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                    #39
                    Our doctor have done that for years. I have even seen someone with a folding camping chair at the head of the queue. Goodness knows how long he'd been there. They do have a second release of appointments at 1.30pm for phone calls only. If you want a routine non-urgent appointment it's 4-6 weeks' wait. Problem is, you don't always know if it's urgent or not. The population of our small town hasn't grown significantly in the 26 years we've lived here, and there are more doctors than there used to be. I can only assume that it's partly an ageing population, more treatments available, or, more probably people just not willing to put up with minor ailments or just go to the pharmacy for over the counter medication. As an example, I overheard a woman in the Coop which is next to the surgery complain that she couldn't get an appointment because she had pricked her foot on a pin she'd dropped. She was happily doing her shopping with no obvious sign of discomfort.
                    Originally posted by zopadooper, skegness (2) View Post
                    My doctors surgery has now "upgraded" its service so the ONLY way you can see a doctor is to go and queue before they open at 8:00am in the hope of getting an appointment. My wife was third in the queue at at 7:25 and finally saw a doctor (not one of her choice) at 9:30. No, that is not worth another penny on income tax.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by Santa, Redditch View Post
                      Apparently, a penny on income tax would raise £6 billion. A drop in the bucket on a budget of £116.4 billion.

                      NI is just part of income tax, (13.8% of earnings between £702 and £3,863 a month) but when you reach retirement age you no longer have to pay it. I have always said that it should be absorbed into the standard tax rates, but taking the age exemption away would be a good start.

                      For those who grumble about impoverished pensioners who can barely afford their semi-annual cruise, it does not bite unless you earn enough, so those on state pensions or even a little more would not be affected.
                      May I add that many employers employ casual/part-time workers on sufficient hours to eliminate NIC. When they reach retirement age, they may not receive a full state pension plus they are not contributing to funding the NHS.

                      Annie

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by PeterM, Southwell View Post
                        Our doctor have done that for years. I have even seen someone with a folding camping chair at the head of the queue. Goodness knows how long he'd been there. They do have a second release of appointments at 1.30pm for phone calls only. If you want a routine non-urgent appointment it's 4-6 weeks' wait. Problem is, you don't always know if it's urgent or not. The population of our small town hasn't grown significantly in the 26 years we've lived here, and there are more doctors than there used to be. I can only assume that it's partly an ageing population, more treatments available, or, more probably people just not willing to put up with minor ailments or just go to the pharmacy for over the counter medication. As an example, I overheard a woman in the Coop which is next to the surgery complain that she couldn't get an appointment because she had pricked her foot on a pin she'd dropped. She was happily doing her shopping with no obvious sign of discomfort.
                        I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

                        Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

                        There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

                        A wonderful "one stop shop".

                        Comment


                          #42
                          To make an appointment at our Doctors you used to have two choices, either you could queue outside the doctors waiting for them to open at 8/30am and make an appointment with receptionist, people would start queuing at 8am.

                          Or

                          You could ring at 8/30 hoping to get an appointment.

                          Now to save people queuing they open the phone lines at 8am, still do not open until 8/30am, whichever system they use the Doctors do not start seeing patients until 9am.

                          At least you have got some options which is reasonable. Our afternoon appointments are reserved for repeat visits and there is no facility to make an appointment by phone or to book a non-urgent appointment for weeks into the future.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
                            I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

                            Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

                            There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

                            A wonderful "one stop shop".
                            Think you are one of the lucky ones John, I think it also depend on how many patients are registered with your surgery ours has over 7,000 patients. It has a patient * rating of 1.2*.

                            We have 4 Doctors although only 2/3 seem to be on duty at the same time, 2 nurses and 2 health care assistants, Boots pharmacy is next door.

                            Extracted from Doctors on line info but in reality if you don't ring at 8am, you don't get an appointment as they all taken. On line appointments are general for advance appointments.

                            Appointments

                            When you call the Surgery we have options so you can go direct to whom you need to speak to:-
                            Press 1: Appointments, General Enquiries and Secretaries 08:00am - 18:30pm.
                            Press 2: Home Visits - call between 09:00 and 10:30am
                            Press 3: Prescriptions - call between 10:00am and 14:00pm
                            Press 4: Test Results- call between 14:00 and 16:00 pm

                            Doctors
                            The majority of our appointments are available to book on the day either by telephone or on-line. We also have appointments to book over four weeks in advance as well as a system for telephone advice.

                            Nurses
                            Our Nurse Practitioner, Practice Nurses and Healthcare Assistants are available by pre-bookable appointments only.

                            General Appointment Information
                            We recognise that sometimes getting an appointment may not be easy, but do offer a telephone call from a clinician if your situation is urgent for that day. Your ideal time may not be available, but our staff will offer what is available and will always do their best to assist you. When phoning for an appointment you will be asked for the reason for your request. This will be so we can assign the best appointment for you.

                            We always try and place you with the Doctor of your choice, but that may not always be possible. Please note all clinicians have full access to your records.
                            Last edited by Delboy, Essex; 11th June 2018, 09:19 AM.
                            Delboy


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                              #44
                              Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
                              I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

                              Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

                              There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

                              A wonderful "one stop shop".
                              I have a different take - all these posts illustrate the 'postcode lottery' that operates within the NHS.

                              Annie

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Didn't Gordon Brown put a penny on NI about 15 years ago?
                                Brian

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