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  • jan lowden, sunderland (2)
    started a topic missing plane.

    missing plane.

    It seems incredible that Malaysian Airlines sent people texts to let them know that they believe the flight was lost forever. I dont think i can remember such a farce over a tragic accident (if indeed it was an accident) Can you imagine what it must have been like for those poor relatives? Jan.

  • trevor432990, East Sussex
    replied
    Originally posted by trevor432990, East Sussex View Post
    I don't think the Malaysians have always shown much 'tact' when it comes to delivering the news to relatives but also I don't think they have deserved the amount of criticism levelled at them by the Chinese relatives and media. Considering the circumstances in fact I believe they have done quite well in keeping everyone briefed. No doubt there are lessons to be learned in handling such disasters in future and in this day and age there is no excuse for a civil aircraft to be able to simply vanish off the radar screens and there should be no manual disconnect available for pilots.
    Think I might change my mind about the Malaysian Governments handling of the crisis now having read they are now saying :-

    1) The final words from the plane were not as originally stated
    2) Voice recognition tests are still underway and not completed as they previously reported
    3) They said that the British company Inmarsat (who advised them on planes location) had refused to attend a meeting with Chinese relatives but the CEO of Inmarsat said they have never received an invitation for such a conference

    They just seem to be digging a bigger hole for themselves every day.
    Last edited by trevor432990, East Sussex; 2nd April 2014, 09:32 AM.

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  • jimtheoldsalt, felixstowe
    replied
    This info is out there somewhere one just has to sort the wheat from the chaff,
    jim

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  • trevor432990, East Sussex
    replied
    Yes could be Cruise Fairy or they are using military satellites and are have released the data in confidence. Anyway the results of todays plane searches look fruitful as five of them spotted debris so with luck tomorrow when the ships arrive they will be able to pick up some of it for closer examination.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cruise Fairy, Indiana USA (2)
    replied
    Trevor- when this whole thing started, CNN reported that there were some countries along the Arc who were reluctant or refused to release any data...... maybe they now have it?

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  • trevor432990, East Sussex
    replied
    Is anyone else confused by todays news that the Malaysian authorities are 'now' saying that they have radar data of the planes movements from which they have now calculated the speed it was travelling was faster than they originally thought and as a result they are moving the search area to 600 miles North East of the previous area.

    My question is where did this 'new' radar data suddenly appear from? The last I heard the only data being used to locate the aircraft was the satellite ping data which the AAIB had. The only previous radar data announced by the Malaysians (I think) was indicating the plane was heading towards the Indian Ocean or did I miss something from another source ?

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  • cruisers, London (2)
    replied
    Originally posted by trevor432990, East Sussex View Post
    It is a good question Cruise Fairy and given that most computer systems have so called 'back doors' in them to allow for easy access and maintenance by software engineers during testing who's to say that they have not all been removed before they go live. I'd say it is feasible given enough knowledge to view data being sent from the plane to the ground but as far as I know none of the essential equipment onboard such as engines, navigation or cockpit controls can be re-programmed from the ground but as Wilba seems to be the expert on this I'll let him answer.

    I doubt very much if there are any experts or otherwise on this forum able to provide the correct explanation as to how the passengers on this aircraft met their fate. I rather think that we will never know and should now consider it a unexplained mystery, until, if ever concrete evidence is unearthed to shed light on the events leading up to the eventual crashing of the plane and death of the passengers onboard.
    j

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  • Mitchell Derby, Derby
    replied
    Lynn I'm afraid those figures are more journalistic rubbish

    Oh heck - I suppose I should have known!! At least I feel better now about not understanding it ...

    Cheers,
    Lynn

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  • Wilba
    replied
    Originally posted by Mitchell Derby, Derby View Post
    Were the passengers aware at the time there was a problem; were they awake/conscious...?

    There's been some talk about the pilot having taken the aircraft up to 45,000 feet; apparently at that altitude the oxygen on board would have run out in about 12 minutes

    I don't pretend to understand that, but if it's true then at least the passengers might not have suffered right up until the crash??

    Cheers,
    Lynn
    Lynn I'm afraid those figures are more journalistic rubbish.

    The B777 is able to operate up to 43,000ft in normal operational mode, although 39,000 ft is a more typical maximum operating altitude.

    For the aircraft to climb another couple of thousand feet above that and everyone die 12 minutes later is just nonsense.

    I can only guess that this codswallop has emanated from an assumption that in the event of a cabin decompression, instead of the aircraft making an emergency decent to below 10,000ft, it was climbed up to 45,000ft, then the limited available oxygen from the drop down masks would be time critical.............Wilba

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  • Mitchell Derby, Derby
    replied
    Were the passengers aware at the time there was a problem; were they awake/conscious...?

    There's been some talk about the pilot having taken the aircraft up to 45,000 feet; apparently at that altitude the oxygen on board would have run out in about 12 minutes

    I don't pretend to understand that, but if it's true then at least the passengers might not have suffered right up until the crash??

    Cheers,
    Lynn

    Leave a comment:


  • jan lowden, sunderland (2)
    replied
    Many years ago i read a book by one of my favorite authors Nelson De Mille,he co-wrote a book with Thomas Block,an ex US Air force and commercial pilot,the book was called Mayday and even though i am not flying savvy, the story,though fiction was enthralling in the details of what can and cant be done to aircraft,add to the fact as in 911 the lack of passport checks, lax security etc, even i am getting my conspiricy theory head on!! Jan.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cruise Fairy, Indiana USA (2)
    replied
    These pilots have invited passengers into the cockpit too, in the past, so no telling who they might have had in there for this flight....

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs M
    replied
    Originally posted by jimtheoldsalt, felixstowe View Post
    Re mobile phones,I did read that this 777had air radio in first class so there was a means of communication for some passengers.
    From my very [ok extremely] limited understanding, doesn't it depend where the plane was, how high, was the main switch thingy turned on in the cockpit...so many variables i.e. were the passengers aware at the time there was a problem; were they awake/conscious...?

    I'd love to think, if only for the pilots families sake, there was a catastrophic incident which rendered them all unconscious, as in the Payne Stewart case. The thought of all the passengers terrified out of their wits doesn't bear thinking about.
    Last edited by Mrs M; 26th March 2014, 11:28 AM. Reason: innappropriate apostrophe

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  • Mrs M
    replied
    Originally posted by trevor432990, East Sussex View Post
    Well I obviously missed some of the coverage Mrs.M, twas not a grievous fault on my part.

    Whilst I tend to side with the pilot having done it I guess it begs the question did he kill the co-pilot or wait till he was out of the cockpit and lock the door? Surely anyone can buy time in a 777 simulator if they want and read or be shown how to turn off the engine monitoring systems.
    Of course it isn't, but it helps to have actual facts about a subject when airing views.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimtheoldsalt, felixstowe
    replied
    Re mobile phones,I did read that this 777had air radio in first class so there was a means of communication for some passengers.

    re transponders,I was surprised to read that there was so few individual codes for all aircraft.Over the past 4years I have kept a finger on all flights taken by my daughters family all over the world using AIS.As long as I have the flight number and approx time of take off I can pick up the plane and keep tabs on it ,except for a couple of remote areas.
    The information I get on my screen is flight number ,plane type squeak/ident,height ,speed and course/track,there can be hundreds of planes on the same screen at the same time and all one has to do is click on a target,very impressive.
    After that bit of useless info like others I believe and have done for some time that the disappearance was an deliberate act because in my view any attempt at a hijack and the cockpit crew would have been able to get off a emergency call,
    jim

    Leave a comment:


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