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Paying a Penny to help NHS

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  • Mariers2, Rushden
    started a topic Paying a Penny to help NHS

    Paying a Penny to help NHS

    From what I read recently, a lot of people are in favour of paying an extra penny to help fund the NHS.

    On the face of it, it seems little enough to ask, though a dark thought has crept into my brain.

    As the underlying idea is to destroy the NHS in covert ways, and promote privatisation, is it possible that more stringent cuts would be made in various services on order to wipe out the funding people would be creating?

    Can someone tell me that could not happen?

  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by Delboy, Essex View Post
    We have 4 Doctors at our surgery, 3 female, 1 male, none of them British.
    When you are sitting in the waiting room, you have a job to understand what they are saying when the name of the next patient is called by the doctor over the loud speaker system. just saying.
    I had to check my GP's website - 3 doctors all female. Not surprising as the majority of medical students are female and that has been the trend for several years. Not representative though.

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • Delboy, Essex
    replied
    We have 4 Doctors at our surgery, 3 female, 1 male, none of them British.
    When you are sitting in the waiting room, you have a job to understand what they are saying when the name of the next patient is called by the doctor over the loud speaker system. just saying.

    Leave a comment:


  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
    With both main parties committed to devolving decision making in all areas of public services down to lower and lower levels there cannot be anything other than "post code lottery's". Each local decision making body will have it's own priorities depending on it's own particular circumstances.
    May I add that the NHS operates differently between the countries of the U.K ?

    All the posts relate to England. I have no recent GP experience to offer.

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by annie, Glasgow View Post
    I have a different take - all these posts illustrate the 'postcode lottery' that operates within the NHS.

    Annie
    With both main parties committed to devolving decision making in all areas of public services down to lower and lower levels there cannot be anything other than "post code lottery's". Each local decision making body will have it's own priorities depending on it's own particular circumstances.

    Leave a comment:


  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by Ingle, Warwickshire View Post
    Didn't Gordon Brown put a penny on NI about 15 years ago?
    Brian
    Problem with NI is that not everyone pays it.

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • Ingle, Warwickshire
    replied
    Didn't Gordon Brown put a penny on NI about 15 years ago?
    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
    I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

    Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

    There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

    A wonderful "one stop shop".
    I have a different take - all these posts illustrate the 'postcode lottery' that operates within the NHS.

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • Delboy, Essex
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
    I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

    Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

    There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

    A wonderful "one stop shop".
    Think you are one of the lucky ones John, I think it also depend on how many patients are registered with your surgery ours has over 7,000 patients. It has a patient * rating of 1.2*.

    We have 4 Doctors although only 2/3 seem to be on duty at the same time, 2 nurses and 2 health care assistants, Boots pharmacy is next door.

    Extracted from Doctors on line info but in reality if you don't ring at 8am, you don't get an appointment as they all taken. On line appointments are general for advance appointments.

    Appointments

    When you call the Surgery we have options so you can go direct to whom you need to speak to:-
    Press 1: Appointments, General Enquiries and Secretaries 08:00am - 18:30pm.
    Press 2: Home Visits - call between 09:00 and 10:30am
    Press 3: Prescriptions - call between 10:00am and 14:00pm
    Press 4: Test Results- call between 14:00 and 16:00 pm

    Doctors
    The majority of our appointments are available to book on the day either by telephone or on-line. We also have appointments to book over four weeks in advance as well as a system for telephone advice.

    Nurses
    Our Nurse Practitioner, Practice Nurses and Healthcare Assistants are available by pre-bookable appointments only.

    General Appointment Information
    We recognise that sometimes getting an appointment may not be easy, but do offer a telephone call from a clinician if your situation is urgent for that day. Your ideal time may not be available, but our staff will offer what is available and will always do their best to assist you. When phoning for an appointment you will be asked for the reason for your request. This will be so we can assign the best appointment for you.

    We always try and place you with the Doctor of your choice, but that may not always be possible. Please note all clinicians have full access to your records.
    Last edited by Delboy, Essex; 11th June 2018, 09:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • zopadooper, skegness (2)
    replied
    To make an appointment at our Doctors you used to have two choices, either you could queue outside the doctors waiting for them to open at 8/30am and make an appointment with receptionist, people would start queuing at 8am.

    Or

    You could ring at 8/30 hoping to get an appointment.

    Now to save people queuing they open the phone lines at 8am, still do not open until 8/30am, whichever system they use the Doctors do not start seeing patients until 9am.

    At least you have got some options which is reasonable. Our afternoon appointments are reserved for repeat visits and there is no facility to make an appointment by phone or to book a non-urgent appointment for weeks into the future.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by PeterM, Southwell View Post
    Our doctor have done that for years. I have even seen someone with a folding camping chair at the head of the queue. Goodness knows how long he'd been there. They do have a second release of appointments at 1.30pm for phone calls only. If you want a routine non-urgent appointment it's 4-6 weeks' wait. Problem is, you don't always know if it's urgent or not. The population of our small town hasn't grown significantly in the 26 years we've lived here, and there are more doctors than there used to be. I can only assume that it's partly an ageing population, more treatments available, or, more probably people just not willing to put up with minor ailments or just go to the pharmacy for over the counter medication. As an example, I overheard a woman in the Coop which is next to the surgery complain that she couldn't get an appointment because she had pricked her foot on a pin she'd dropped. She was happily doing her shopping with no obvious sign of discomfort.
    I find this and the other similar posts unbelievable.

    Our surgery is rural surgery in a village 4 miles away. We can always get an urgent appointment the same day and almost always a routine appointment the same day with the doctor of our choice. No telephone inquisition and no queuing up outside at the crack of dawn.

    There are several practise nurses and because the nearest pharmacy is more than so many miles away the surgery has it's own dispensary.

    A wonderful "one stop shop".

    Leave a comment:


  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by Santa, Redditch View Post
    Apparently, a penny on income tax would raise £6 billion. A drop in the bucket on a budget of £116.4 billion.

    NI is just part of income tax, (13.8% of earnings between £702 and £3,863 a month) but when you reach retirement age you no longer have to pay it. I have always said that it should be absorbed into the standard tax rates, but taking the age exemption away would be a good start.

    For those who grumble about impoverished pensioners who can barely afford their semi-annual cruise, it does not bite unless you earn enough, so those on state pensions or even a little more would not be affected.
    May I add that many employers employ casual/part-time workers on sufficient hours to eliminate NIC. When they reach retirement age, they may not receive a full state pension plus they are not contributing to funding the NHS.

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • PeterM, Southwell
    replied
    Our doctor have done that for years. I have even seen someone with a folding camping chair at the head of the queue. Goodness knows how long he'd been there. They do have a second release of appointments at 1.30pm for phone calls only. If you want a routine non-urgent appointment it's 4-6 weeks' wait. Problem is, you don't always know if it's urgent or not. The population of our small town hasn't grown significantly in the 26 years we've lived here, and there are more doctors than there used to be. I can only assume that it's partly an ageing population, more treatments available, or, more probably people just not willing to put up with minor ailments or just go to the pharmacy for over the counter medication. As an example, I overheard a woman in the Coop which is next to the surgery complain that she couldn't get an appointment because she had pricked her foot on a pin she'd dropped. She was happily doing her shopping with no obvious sign of discomfort.
    Originally posted by zopadooper, skegness (2) View Post
    My doctors surgery has now "upgraded" its service so the ONLY way you can see a doctor is to go and queue before they open at 8:00am in the hope of getting an appointment. My wife was third in the queue at at 7:25 and finally saw a doctor (not one of her choice) at 9:30. No, that is not worth another penny on income tax.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delboy, Essex
    replied
    To make an appointment at our Doctors you used to have two choices, either you could queue outside the doctors waiting for them to open at 8/30am and make an appointment with receptionist, people would start queuing at 8am.

    Or

    You could ring at 8/30 hoping to get an appointment.

    Now to save people queuing they open the phone lines at 8am, still do not open until 8/30am, whichever system they use the Doctors do not start seeing patients until 9am.

    I had to make an appointment this week, I rang dead on 8am a recorded message told me Doctors was not open giving me an emergency no. I rang back immediately this time I was informed I was no 10 in a queue.

    I waited until it was my turn, when I got through the receptionist ask me if my problem could be dealt with by a nurse etc, I informed her of my problem she informed me I should see the Doctor and an appointment was made for 10:20am, I was seen at 10:40am. I did notice that the waiting room was the emptiest I have ever seen it.

    I was asked by the doctor if I had been taking any medication for the pain, told him only over the counter medication he did not offer me any other, but sent me for a Curvical Spine X Ray at our local hospital. Three people in front of me at XRay dept, when I came out it was packed. Have to wait 10 days for XRay results.

    Leave a comment:


  • carol, welwyn garden city
    replied
    Originally posted by zopadooper, skegness (2) View Post
    My doctors surgery has now "upgraded" its service so the ONLY way you can see a doctor is to go and queue before they open at 8:00am in the hope of getting an appointment. My wife was third in the queue at at 7:25 and finally saw a doctor (not one of her choice) at 9:30. No, that is not worth another penny on income tax.
    Ours used to do that, they have now changed it, and when you ring for an appointment a Doctor phones you back. They then decide if you get an appointment or not! .................................................. .............Carol

    Leave a comment:


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