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What's your view on Uber?

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  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    started a topic What's your view on Uber?

    What's your view on Uber?

    Currently there is an issue in York about Uber drivers licenced in other towns and cities. I did a little research and it turns out the law was changed in 2015 and a private hire driver licenced in any town can now work in any other area, as long as the journey is pre-booked.

    So Uber drivers are getting licences in a low cost town and then simply working all over the place, as the Uber App is non-geographic.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...gmb-union-says

    In Leeds there is an active team of inspectors and a strict set of controls on drivers and cars, but they are only empowered to check on Leeds taxis, they can't stop drivers from other areas.

    So is it just the new way or should we be worried as to who is controlling them?

    Cheers

    Tony B

  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    replied
    Originally posted by carol, welwyn garden city View Post
    They do spot checks round our way on Private Hire drivers and the penalty is really strict..........................................Ca rol
    Unfortunately the inspectors can only inspect those with your town's licence. Those from another area can legally work anywhere as long as they are picking up pre-booked passengers - which the use of an app facilitates.

    Any complaints go back to their home authority, and in Leeds we have about 11000 licenced private hire drivers (including Uber). What chance they will follow up a complaint from York?

    Where the complaint is actually a criminal rather than regulation issue, e.g. picking up none pre-booked passengers invalidates insurance, so becomes a criminal offence, then the police can be informed - need I say more about police interest?

    So the change in the law, which was intended to allow drivers to work between adjacent borders or in shared areas (Pudsey between Leeds and Bradford for example) has now allowed the anarchy of drivers with a licence from one end of the world to work with impunity and minimal control at the other end of the country, where he may even not qualify for a licence.

    So is the answer to national branded companies a national standard, policeable by any inspector and applicable to all private hire?

    Cheers

    Tony B

    Leave a comment:


  • Wilba
    replied
    Originally posted by Topdeck, London View Post
    live/dynamic traffic information can be be made readily available to all, once you do that the knowledge has limited use.

    The other significant change is the need for hackney services has been overtaken by the introduction of mobile phones,
    The problem is that once every man and his dog has live traffic information available, every man and his dog are chasing the same end.

    Call me a dinosaur but you can't beat experience with someone who can think outside the box when needs arise.

    Who would you prefer to be in command when the engines on your holiday Airbus go bang.

    Chesney Sullenburger with years of real experience or a 19 year old with 90 hours flying mainly on a Simulator?

    A fair difference to taxi driving I know, but the same logic applies..........Wilba

    Leave a comment:


  • carol, welwyn garden city
    replied
    Originally posted by toshtosh, Guiseley View Post
    Yes,

    but Uber (and any other private hire with a global app) drivers from nearby towns can still work in York.

    Also a reminder - Hackney licences allow you to hail the cab or get in at a rank, whereas private hire are only allowed to pick up pre-booked drivers only. If you get into any private hire (mini-cab) that isn't pre-booked the insurance is automatically invalid. That is not an urban myth. Just think how many people you know come out from an evening event and just jump in to the nearest waiting "cab".

    In Leeds the hackneys are white with a black bonnet and have a TAXI sign. Private hires are not allowed to use TAXI anywhere on the vehicle.

    Using the Uber app meets the requirement, but has anybody ever just got in a waiting Uber (or other private hire) and paid cash?

    Cheers

    Tony B
    They do spot checks round our way on Private Hire drivers and the penalty is really strict..........................................Ca rol

    Leave a comment:


  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    replied
    Originally posted by annie, Glasgow View Post
    Uber has lost their taxi licence in York.

    Annie
    Yes,

    but Uber (and any other private hire with a global app) drivers from nearby towns can still work in York.

    Also a reminder - Hackney licences allow you to hail the cab or get in at a rank, whereas private hire are only allowed to pick up pre-booked drivers only. If you get into any private hire (mini-cab) that isn't pre-booked the insurance is automatically invalid. That is not an urban myth. Just think how many people you know come out from an evening event and just jump in to the nearest waiting "cab".

    In Leeds the hackneys are white with a black bonnet and have a TAXI sign. Private hires are not allowed to use TAXI anywhere on the vehicle.

    Using the Uber app meets the requirement, but has anybody ever just got in a waiting Uber (or other private hire) and paid cash?

    Cheers

    Tony B

    Leave a comment:


  • Topdeck, London
    replied
    live/dynamic traffic information can be be made readily available to all, once you do that the knowledge has limited use.

    The other significant change is the need for hackney services has been overtaken by the introduction of mobile phones,

    Leave a comment:


  • dst87, Falkirk
    replied
    Originally posted by Wilba View Post
    Do you mean requirements .......or Standards?
    My experience of using Uber in London is that the drivers are friendlier than Black Cab drivers, and I’ve never had a route problem. Drivers use the Uber driver app on their smartphone which has a pretty competent mapping system with real-time traffic information feeding into the route. I honestly believe that these days The Knowledge is an unnecessary bit of training for cabbies, however steeped in tradition in may be.

    I would say universal standards should apply to all cab firms and private hire companies, but these should be focussed on background checks, medical checks etc to ensure as much as possible that drivers and passengers are safe. This is where Uber pissed me off in London - they should have conformed to the checks that were asked of them, not try and encourage users to protest the city for ensuring safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • andyn, Bucks
    replied
    Why lower any standards or requirements, why not raise everyone up to the higher standards or requirements.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wilba
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
    Time to lower the black cab requirements then?
    Do you mean requirements .......or Standards?

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by Wilba View Post
    I realise that London is standalone when it comes to years of dedicated training to gain 'The Knowledge', but these guys must feel bitter when you consider the effort they put in, plus the overpriced cost of purchasing a Black Cab plus the strict maintenance procedures, then along comes a guy with a private hire licence, a five year old car and a sat nav from Halfords and takes business from him.

    If I were a London Black Cab Driver I would feel quite aggrieved..............Wilba
    Time to lower the black cab requirements then?

    Leave a comment:


  • Wilba
    replied
    I realise that London is standalone when it comes to years of dedicated training to gain 'The Knowledge', but these guys must feel bitter when you consider the effort they put in, plus the overpriced cost of purchasing a Black Cab plus the strict maintenance procedures, then along comes a guy with a private hire licence, a five year old car and a sat nav from Halfords and takes business from him.

    If I were a London Black Cab Driver I would feel quite aggrieved..............Wilba

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by Topdeck, London View Post
    Our council are hot on the private hire they wander round town in packs stopping them and doing checks.

    Why it needs 4 of them to check one cab I have no idea, saw them the other day 3 of the 4 discussing some dirt on the door of an otherwise clean cab.
    Jobsworths.

    It's in areas like this Councils can save money. If all drivers know they will be checked on an un-announced random basis they will "behave". Your Council could then "release" 3 of them and save £K60 plus a year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topdeck, London
    replied
    Originally posted by jan lowden, sunderland (2) View Post
    Our taxi company has an App, Its fine for the young and more computer savvy older customers. But a lot of customers cant get by with our automated booking system and want to speak to a "real" person. The best thing about an old fashioned booking by phone is all calls are recorded, So any doubt / complaint can be looked into promptly and efficiently. Also all licensed Hackney carriages are regulated by the council and are constantly checked out, both drivers (who are all CRB checked) and their cars/cabs. Jan.
    Our council are hot on the private hire they wander round town in packs stopping them and doing checks.

    Why it needs 4 of them to check one cab I have no idea, saw them the other day 3 of the 4 discussing some dirt on the door of an otherwise clean cab.

    Leave a comment:


  • annie, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by dst87, Falkirk View Post
    I think this is the key thing where retail just cannot compete. The service, convenience, and availability of products online is second-to-none. We now have access to a wealth of online resources to help identify which new appliance is right for you, but no retail store can realistically have them all. Seeing products is the big advantage of retail, so when they don’t even have the thing you want they’re already losing.

    I also have the problem that some of the nicer shops turn their noses up at me because I go in with jeans and a hoodie on. Maybe I look like I can’t afford it and they don’t want to give me the time of day? I include John Lewis (Edinburgh) in this. Their loss. Online stores only care if my credit card is accepted!
    Sounds like a scene from Prettty Woman Duncan

    Back to retail not displaying all stock alternatives. What is the current wheeze - customers visit physical stores, examine the goods and return home and order them from some retailer like AO !

    Annie

    Leave a comment:


  • dst87, Falkirk
    replied
    Originally posted by cruiser, Larne View Post
    In relation to NI we are finding more and more parking restrictions in town centres which affects high street shops forcing many to close. This in turn makes people look to 'out of town' stores like Tesco and Asda and for the rest, home deliveries are the answer. I admit to shopping online - I Have just purchased a couple of large kitchen appliances and the company who delivers will take away the old ones. How convenient! They sent me a text to say the order was being processed, another to say the time the goods will be delivered and will ring me an hour before arrival to ensure I am at home. I did try to buy locally but the product wasn't available - their loss!
    I think this is the key thing where retail just cannot compete. The service, convenience, and availability of products online is second-to-none. We now have access to a wealth of online resources to help identify which new appliance is right for you, but no retail store can realistically have them all. Seeing products is the big advantage of retail, so when they don’t even have the thing you want they’re already losing.

    I also have the problem that some of the nicer shops turn their noses up at me because I go in with jeans and a hoodie on. Maybe I look like I can’t afford it and they don’t want to give me the time of day? I include John Lewis (Edinburgh) in this. Their loss. Online stores only care if my credit card is accepted!

    Leave a comment:


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