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EU beat Boris/Dominic with shock and awe

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  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    started a topic EU beat Boris/Dominic with shock and awe

    EU beat Boris/Dominic with shock and awe

    Deal or No Deal it seems we are well and truly in it from Jan 2021. (Or should that be out of it?)

    https://www.globalcoldchainnews.com/...-awe-campaign/

    Note these are real - not a parody.

    For those bypassing the article (It is quite long) the EU has issued a wide range of changes that WILL now happen irrespective of any deal or no deal.

    Headlines include:

    UK hauliers will need EU registration to operate in the EU and there is a tiny quota available.Border formalities will also affect drivers as well as passengers and cross-border workers. This includes border checks on persons – entailing the verification of entry and stay requirements, stamping of passports, and visa requirements if applicable.

    Tourist short stays (90 days in 180) will not require visas. However anybody staying longer will need a visa.

    Visitors and tourists
    UK nationals travelling to the European Union and the Schengen area will be treated as third-country nationals, and therefore subject to thorough checks at the Schengen area border. This means that intended stays cannot have a duration of more than 90 days in any 180-day period, and UK nationals will have to meet the entry conditions for third-country nationals. They can also no longer make use of the EU/EEA/CH fast lanes reserved for persons enjoying the right to free movement when crossing the border.

    Customs formalities on goods
    Customs rules required under EU law will apply to all goods entering the customs territory of the EU from the United Kingdom, or leaving that customs territory to the United Kingdom. Even if an ambitious free trade area is established with the EU, providing for zero tariffs and zero quotas on goods with customs and regulatory cooperation, all the regulatory non-tariff barriers, usually far more costly in extra paperwork and delays than any tariff, will still apply.

    Rules of origin
    Again, if we agree a trade deal with zero tariffs, goods traded will have to be shown (with evidence if necessary) to have a minimum percentage of UK content in order for them to be entitled to preferential zero-tariff-zero-quota treatment. It’s worth bearing in mind that most cars manufactured in the UK do not meet the minimum percentage set out in the EU- Korean FTA, for example, which is 55%.

    and so on:

    And this is the best we can get

    No deal adds tariffs in and out.

    Cheers

    Tony B

  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by toshtosh, Guiseley View Post
    OOI a new survey shows almost 60% now want to stay in the EU.
    The UK left the EU at 11 p.m. GMT on 31 January 2020 so there is no question of “staying in the EU”. Says everything about a survey that would include “staying in the EU” as a choice!

    Leave a comment:


  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    replied
    Anybody thinking the EU will budge in this game of chicken should read this:

    https://committees.parliament.uk/oralevidence/629/pdf/

    It is the official transcript of a meeting between Michel Barnier and a House of Lords committee in late June. It is quite long and takes the form of a Q&A session.

    This is just one extract from one of Mr Barnier's answers:

    "On the one hand, the UK, in each of the sectors, is asking for a status that is more or less equivalent to that of a member state for the single market, the customs union, Schengen, rules of origin, mutual recognition, financial services, professional qualifications, data flow and exchange of electricity. So you are actually asking for the advantages of being a member state without having the limitations and the discipline. It is general cherry picking, and that is not acceptable to us."

    No Deal - Nobody wins.

    So will Boris/Dominic blink first?

    OOI a new survey shows almost 60% now want to stay in the EU.

    Leave a comment:


  • toshtosh, Guiseley
    replied
    I see many still misunderstand the changes I linked to.

    Irrespective of whether we get a deal or not these changes will now happen and ALL with have a negative impact on the lives of all residents of the UK.

    Nobody suggests that we will not still trade with the EU, but it could only ever be under their rules for third countries and that is fraught with protectionism, which as we well know are complex and bureaucratic.

    They would happily offer a deal but only if we make reasonable concessions - and yes I know we are now a sovereign state but we are no longer a major trading nation when compared with the EU27, China and the USA.

    And since Boris's oven ready deal was a blatant lie (just like extra money for the NHS) we will have to add on the WTO tariffs both ways for many key products - remember that tariffs are not bi-lateral - the EU has its list and the UK has its list. And unless a formal trade deal has been formally agreed the UK tariffs on imports have to be applied to all countries. Equally you have to pay individual countries their declared tariffs.

    I am still waiting for any Brexiteer to show me a credible financial analysis that we will be anything other than worse off after the end of transition - the only question is by how much.


    .

    Leave a comment:


  • philhar, wallasey
    replied
    Project fear was Cameron and Osborne.
    It might be tiresome but it has already been shown that leaving with no deal will have a devastating effect on some sectors of the economy, WTO is negligible in some sectors but not others .
    Asking farmers,as just an example, to "suck it up" with 40% tarrif(possibly more) is bit rich.Farmers operate on tight margins at the best of times.
    The current crisis ,not asking for more time and the preference amongst some in Government for a no deal Brexit are all contributing to no deal being most likely
    Quite obviously, some sectors will not be able to suck it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • tdb, Brentwood
    replied
    Shame those who opine about border controls in relation to future trade in goods between the UK and the EU after Brexit do so without understanding that the crucial factor will NOT be about tariffs (WTO or otherwise)! The need for effective border controls (however and wherever performed) will be determined by ‘Non Tariff Barriers’ caused by the range of important health & safety (animals as well as people), environmental, fair competition, workers rights factors if UK freedom leads to significant variations between EU and UK standards!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Issyalex, Glasgow
    replied
    Originally posted by Topdeck, London View Post

    We worked out if you use Delta or AA to travel to America often the aliens queue is shorter as most on the flight are American.

    probably same will happen with Europe use the local carrier as long as not too much more.
    Exactly TD.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topdeck, London
    replied
    Originally posted by Issyalex, Glasgow View Post
    As for having to stand in the ‘third world’ queues at customs that was a given as we don’t/won’t belong to the EU. It will just be the same as waiting in the non USA queues in America......it’s no big deal, it will just take longer to go through customs.
    We worked out if you use Delta or AA to travel to America often the aliens queue is shorter as most on the flight are American.

    probably same will happen with Europe use the local carrier as long as not too much more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Issyalex, Glasgow
    replied
    As for having to stand in the ‘third world’ queues at customs that was a given as we don’t/won’t belong to the EU. It will just be the same as waiting in the non USA queues in America......it’s no big deal, it will just take longer to go through customs.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnR, Chippenham
    replied
    Originally posted by BigMac, Glasgow View Post
    Please don't kick off another round of scaremongering.

    Almost 90% of our imports/exports fall within WTO rules and are tariff free.

    If the EU want to play hard ball, then so be it, They will be the losers.

    I'm old enough to remember pre-1973 when we also bought BMW's, drank French champagne, rode Italian scooters, ate Dutch cheese (and drank Warninks Advocat) and it worked quite well.

    If tariffs are applied, the German car industry stated it would cost them 100,000 jobs worldwide.

    Notice how many people drive Jeeps, Hyundai's, Honda's without any problems, so why should EU imports be so problematic?
    Agreed BigMac. We are leaving with or without a deal end December 2020. Full stop. The EU have been playing the Project Fear card for too long. What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. "Suck it up" as they say.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigMac, Glasgow
    replied
    Please don't kick off another round of scaremongering.

    Almost 90% of our imports/exports fall within WTO rules and are tariff free.

    If the EU want to play hard ball, then so be it, They will be the losers.

    I'm old enough to remember pre-1973 when we also bought BMW's, drank French champagne, rode Italian scooters, ate Dutch cheese (and drank Warninks Advocat) and it worked quite well.

    If tariffs are applied, the German car industry stated it would cost them 100,000 jobs worldwide.

    Notice how many people drive Jeeps, Hyundai's, Honda's without any problems, so why should EU imports be so problematic?

    Leave a comment:


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