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Is your favourite British dish on its way out?

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  • sandraggg, Newcastle
    started a topic Is your favourite British dish on its way out?

    Is your favourite British dish on its way out?

    According to recent research (see the link), some traditional British dishes could be heading for the history books. More than a quarter of us have never eaten toad in the hole, and one in five think it is a fictional dish. A third of us have never tried bubble and squeak. Almost half can't identify pease pudding. Bangers and mash, Scotch egg, black pudding and Eton mess also leave many puzzled.

    Is there a British dish you would happily consign to the history books, or one you would wish to revive for future generations?

    Personally I'd happily see the back of black pudding and pease pudding - both disgusting.

    And I'm happy that no one seems to eat tripe any more. In my childhood, my parents regularly visited the tripe shop. Imagine a shop that sold only tripe!

    I do hope Eton mess flourishes, although I think cranachan is far superior. (I wonder how popular that is?)

    New surveys show Brits don't recognise some traditional British dishes, but why is that and does it matter?

  • BandN, Markyate
    replied
    I like lambs liver, but that is the only offal I eat. OH likes black pudding and haggis, but it's not for me. I eat most other types of food and if eating out, tend to favour Italian and French.

    Barb

    Leave a comment:


  • Mason, Altrincham
    replied
    O. M. G. All I can say folks is that I think Offal is Awful. Bleauch! Yuck a doo! Eeeuuurrrggghhh! 🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤢🤮

    Give me a nice roast beef, Yorkshire pudding, roast potatoes with carrots and broccoli and I’m a happy bunny. If it happens to be followed by my daughters sticky toffee pudding , so much the better. I also make a pretty good trifle as well as Eaton mess.

    Take care. Helen 🍨

    Leave a comment:


  • Delboy, Essex
    replied


    Have no idea what I am having for my evening meal until my wife serves it up, she has no access to this forum and neither do we discuss it’s contents.

    However tonight she made one of my favourite British meals (I don’t cook) as I have mentioned on a previous post, bubble and squeak made with fried mash and onions plus cabbage left over from yesterdays chicken roast ( M&S Oakland Chicken), served with grilled pork sausages and bacon rashers plus plenty of gravy, all washed down with a glass of Pinot.👍😎
    Last edited by Delboy, Essex; 11th October 2021, 06:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mags, cardiff
    replied
    Originally posted by All at sea, Yorks View Post
    OH also enjoys eating black pudding, I think it comes from M&S. i’m not a fan so he cooks it himself.

    But one food my family intoduced to him which he loved was (fresh) laver bread. We had it regularly from the market with sausages and mash.. I was always told it was very good for you! No idea how popular it is now........
    I didnt think of laverbread. Probably because we very rarely have it at home.

    It is very regional, common in the Swansea area where they still gather and prepare the seaweed. I think it is something you love or wouldnt touch, possibly because the raw stuff isnt the prettiest thing. I love it, I lived in Swansea for a time. If we are that way I have been known to buy some in the market.

    As you say Fresh laverbread. I have seen it in tins, at a price, but it doesnt seem like the real thing to me and I have never bought one.

    I have never heard of having it with sausage and mash. The usual way is to fry it up with bacon.

    Interestingly, whenever I go to an Italian retsuarant here I always have their homemade laverbread pizza.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gill Nickson, Albox
    replied
    Originally posted by mags, cardiff View Post
    Love black pudding. Cant stand Eton mess, its the meringue that I dislike in any shape or form, way too sweet.
    The Scottish dishes of cranachan and haggis, yes, both yum.

    Lets hear it for Welsh cakes and cawl (much like Irish stew), both things that we had regularly at home but I dont seem to have the knack of cooking them. Confession - I buy Welsh cakes.

    Yorkshire pudding is OK, I ll eat it when out but never think to make it.

    I loathe liver, even the sight and smell makes me heave. We used to have it at home, not that I ever ate it. My OH likes it, as did my late parents. It became a ritual that when they came to stay with us my mother would buy and cook liver for one meal so that the OH, and they, could have it - I think she thought he was deprived!
    We lived in West Wales for 18 years beforre moving to Spain so I regularly made cawl and I still make Welsh cakes now. We were quite poor when I was growing up so had a lot of dishes made from cheap cuts of meat, and we regularly have liver and onions, which we both love. Paternal grandfather was a gamekeeper, so partridge and pheasant were sometimes on the menu for his family, and shhhh....keep this under your hat....according to family lore, swan was known to have appeared on the table.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandraggg, Newcastle
    replied
    Originally posted by annie, Glasgow View Post


    Eton mess and cranachan can stay.


    Annie

    I first had cranachan on a P&O cruise a few years ago.

    I liked it very much, although I had no idea at the time that it was made with whisky because - P&O being P&O - there was no discernible alcohol in it. (Much like their 'classic SHERRY trifle' which has been nowhere near a sherry bottle. )

    Now I like making it with fresh raspberries when we have a glut of them in the garden.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandraggg, Newcastle
    replied
    Originally posted by Calgray, Yorkshire View Post
    My dad used to love tripe soaked in vinegar. I ate it too. Must admit I did like it. All that changed when I started to buy whole cows stomachs from the local abbatoir for my 6 Great Danes. Dad saw it in its raw green state as I cut it up and vowed......never again.

    My mother used to put breast of lamb in stews. The smell and the grease floating on top put me off forever.
    Have never eaten black pudding or haggis nor cow heel, pigs trotters, eels. I do like my fish but draw the line at Whelks, octopus and oysters that my hubby used to love.


    Carol
    My mother used to buy 'neck end' of lamb because it was so cheap.

    It was mainly gristle and fat. She used to stew it and would then let it get cold so that the layer of fat solidified and could be lifted off. That got thrown out for the wild birds to eat.

    I'd like to say that the end result was delicious, but it really wasn't.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandraggg, Newcastle
    replied
    [QUOTE=Delboy, Essex;n1454296]This is second time of posting, after an immediate edit of changing the word meal to meat it came up as un approved.


    Foods that would not bother me if they disappear are shell seafood, pasta, black pudding, pease pudding, tripe, faggots, kidneys, heart, haggis, pigs trotters,


    /QUOTE]


    SNAP Delboy!!!

    Apart from pasta (which I love) your list matches mine.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandraggg, Newcastle
    replied
    Originally posted by Sparkle, UK View Post
    I can vaguely remember my uncle used to bring us pig’s trotters, he had a friend who worked in an abattoir (although we called them slaughter houses back then). My dad was the only one who ate them, no idea how they were cooked.
    If you feel inclined, you could always try this French recipe for stuffed trotters from a three-starred Michelin chef.

    (However tasty they might be, I couldn't eat them because they look exactly like...pigs' trotters!)

    Pierre Koffmann's stuffed pig's trotter recipe is a true classic, one of the French master's signature dishes from his days at La Tante Claire, where he held three Michelin stars. Pierre serves the dish with crispy pig's skin and pomme purée, made with duck fat for a sublime richness.

    Leave a comment:


  • smtcan, Scarborough
    replied
    I grew up in Wales with a mother who was an excellent cook. She trained in a domestic science college in the early 1930s. I never remember eating Bubble and Squeak or Toad in the Hole, but stews and liver and onions were staple \meals. I remember a (temporary) boyfriend taking me home for supper and his mother served cow heel pie - I had never heard of it and hoped to never taste it again.We ate a lot of fresh fish bought from the boats in Conwy before the EU stopped that. The first time I saw Eton Mess was when a Scottish friend in Canada brought it to a pot luck dinner.

    Sheila

    Leave a comment:


  • Delboy, Essex
    replied
    This is second time of posting, after an immediate edit of changing the word meal to meat it came up as un approved.

    Anybody who has been a member of this forum for any length of time knows that I am definitely not a foodie.

    Red meat still forms a large part of mine and my wife’s diet and I cannot see that changing any time soon. On a recent holiday in Cornwall, steak formed the main stay of my dinner on most evenings in three separate dining establishments,
    Think our daughter is following in our footsteps although she is a little more adventurous than either of us. Although when she recently took her works team out for an evening meal with a couple of visitors from their head office in Canada to a fairly posh restaurant. The only thing on the menu she fancied was Sirloin Steak at £40 a head, but as the company were paying ………For her wedding next year the guests will be tucking into a lovely meal of bangers (sausages) and mash with onion gravy, lovely.

    Love bubble and squeak, had it last week with a couple of rashers, pork sausages and plenty of Bisto gravy, Toad (pork sausages) in the hole is another regular in our household, but my wife now cooks them separately. Don’t mind a little bit of Eaton Mess as a desert..

    Foods that would not bother me if they disappear are shell seafood, pasta, black pudding, pease pudding, tripe, faggots, kidneys, heart, haggis, pigs trotters,

    I remember when I was young my Aunt made rabbit stew which I liked, with rabbit my uncle had personal gone out to catch, the only trouble was the stench as he skinned and gutted it on the scullery table. Have never eaten it since.

    My wife was weaned on jellied eels, does not eat them now, but she is partial to roll mops though

    Leave a comment:


  • Fred Bloggs, Tyne and Wear
    replied
    [QUOTE=sandraggg, Newcastle;n1454242]There's a fair bit of affection for offal on this thread!

    Growing up, we were quite poor and money was tight, so we often had cheaper things to eat. I quite liked liver but much of the other stuff I couldn't stomach.

    One thing that we had frequently was fresh fish. I grew up in a fishing port and there were several fresh fish shops. Every Saturday we joined a large queue to buy some. There were so many types, and they were all really cheap. My dad used to enjoy cooking it and he also made the best fishcakes ever.

    Our cat refused to eat anything other than steamed fish. [/QUOTE

    We didn't have a lot of cash either when I was young but I can't remember eating any of those horrendous meat offerings mentioned like tripe, cow heel & pigs trotters. I suspect my Dad who was a miner would have hit the roof if Mam had offered him any of those. Living in a little sea port he used to go fishing a lot so like you we ate a lot of cod, some haddock and lovely fresh crab & lobster.

    I don't eat meat so thankfully will not have to eat any of those offerings.

    What irritates me about desserts is that anything with apple now seems to have cinammon in it. Must be an American thing as apple pie never had that in it when I was young.YUK!!!!

    I l

    Leave a comment:


  • Topdeck, London
    replied
    Blood based products, often in the form of a sausage shape, are at the core of a lot of cultures and the concept of don't waste anything of an animal that is edible

    Eating tests the our senses beyond the what's it made from that's yuc reaction.

    look/presentation, smell, taste and texture.

    Many get transformed from inedible to trendy.

    I have been tested in the far east a few time by work colleagues.

    Not a fan of sea cucumber it fails all senses.
    looks bad, smells bad, tastes bad, and in the mouth you just want to gag.

    ​​​​​​
    my funny one is I like shell fish including most bivalves like but struggle with razor clams.





    ​​​​​​





    Leave a comment:


  • Calgray, Yorkshire
    replied
    My dad used to love tripe soaked in vinegar. I ate it too. Must admit I did like it. All that changed when I started to buy whole cows stomachs from the local abbatoir for my 6 Great Danes. Dad saw it in its raw green state as I cut it up and vowed......never again.

    My mother used to put breast of lamb in stews. The smell and the grease floating on top put me off forever.
    Have never eaten black pudding or haggis nor cow heel, pigs trotters, eels. I do like my fish but draw the line at Whelks, octopus and oysters that my hubby used to love.


    Carol

    Leave a comment:


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