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Is your favourite British dish on its way out?

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    Is your favourite British dish on its way out?

    According to recent research (see the link), some traditional British dishes could be heading for the history books. More than a quarter of us have never eaten toad in the hole, and one in five think it is a fictional dish. A third of us have never tried bubble and squeak. Almost half can't identify pease pudding. Bangers and mash, Scotch egg, black pudding and Eton mess also leave many puzzled.

    Is there a British dish you would happily consign to the history books, or one you would wish to revive for future generations?

    Personally I'd happily see the back of black pudding and pease pudding - both disgusting.

    And I'm happy that no one seems to eat tripe any more. In my childhood, my parents regularly visited the tripe shop. Imagine a shop that sold only tripe!

    I do hope Eton mess flourishes, although I think cranachan is far superior. (I wonder how popular that is?)

    New surveys show Brits don't recognise some traditional British dishes, but why is that and does it matter?

    #2
    Originally posted by sandraggg, Newcastle View Post
    According to recent research (see the link), some traditional British dishes could be heading for the history books. More than a quarter of us have never eaten toad in the hole, and one in five think it is a fictional dish. A third of us have never tried bubble and squeak. Almost half can't identify pease pudding. Bangers and mash, Scotch egg, black pudding and Eton mess also leave many puzzled.

    Is there a British dish you would happily consign to the history books, or one you would wish to revive for future generations?

    Personally I'd happily see the back of black pudding and pease pudding - both disgusting.

    And I'm happy that no one seems to eat tripe any more. In my childhood, my parents regularly visited the tripe shop. Imagine a shop that sold only tripe!

    I do hope Eton mess flourishes, although I think cranachan is far superior. (I wonder how popular that is?)
    Am with you on consigning tripe to 'Room 101', likewise chtterlings (which I've never tried but my Dad used to like them). Love Eton Mess.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by sandraggg, Newcastle View Post
      According to recent research (see the link), some traditional British dishes could be heading for the history books. More than a quarter of us have never eaten toad in the hole, and one in five think it is a fictional dish. A third of us have never tried bubble and squeak. Almost half can't identify pease pudding. Bangers and mash, Scotch egg, black pudding and Eton mess also leave many puzzled.

      Is there a British dish you would happily consign to the history books, or one you would wish to revive for future generations?

      Personally I'd happily see the back of black pudding and pease pudding - both disgusting.

      And I'm happy that no one seems to eat tripe any more. In my childhood, my parents regularly visited the tripe shop. Imagine a shop that sold only tripe!

      I do hope Eton mess flourishes, although I think cranachan is far superior. (I wonder how popular that is?)
      Hi

      Are the recipes British or English ??

      I have never eaten Toad in the Hole or Pease pudding ( I had to google them )

      I love black pudding BUT it HAS to be Stornoway NOT Bury. cue JC. I ate some last night. I also love Haggis and grill BP and Haggis.

      My father loved tripe (bought at the local butchers).

      Eton mess and cranachan can stay.

      Is it any surprise our cuisine has evolved and JMO for the better with immigration esp from thr sub-continent??

      Recent studies suggest we eat 17% less meat which is excellent news for the planet - cue John R

      Annie

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Annie
        Right on cue just for you,,,,,,there is only one Black Pudding and it is from Bury all the rest are poor imitations.
        974778E1-9B04-4876-860A-E900CB78E08A.jpeg
        It has to be the sausage,,,boiled,,not the sliced ,,fried.

        It must be the Northerner in me but I love Black Pudding,..and Tripe (honeycombed to soak up the vinegar).
        How about a slice of ‘Udder’ on a sandwich or a slice of Brawn on top of some chips left to melt,,,,yum yum!

        My late MiL a Brummie used to love Haslet,,see it on the market not yet tried it.

        P&O sometimes have a starter in the MDR of a slice Black Pudding with a piece of streaky bacon and a poached egg on top,,absolutely delicious.

        Whats ‘Udder’?

        udder
        /ˈʌdə/
        noun
        1. the mammary gland of female cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and related animals, having two or more teats and hanging between the hind legs of the animal.
        How could that description not temp you!
        JC
        Last edited by jc, liverpool; 10th October 2021, 11:19 AM.
        C P Scott,,,,,"Comment is Free,,but Facts are Sacred"
        "You are entitled to your opinion. But you are not entitled to your own facts.

        Comment


          #5
          I agree, Annie, about our food evolving. In our home we mainly eat pasta, rice, noodles... lots of dishes from ethnic cuisines.

          My family do like toad in the hole with onion gravy, though.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jc, liverpool View Post
            Hi Annie
            Right on cue just for you,,,,,,there is only one Black Pudding and it is from Bury all the rest are poor imitations.
            974778E1-9B04-4876-860A-E900CB78E08A.jpeg
            It has to be the sausage,,,boiled,,not the sliced ,,fried.

            It must be the Northerner in me but I love Black Pudding,..and Tripe (honeycombed to soak up the vinegar).
            How about a slice of ‘Udder’ on a sandwich or a slice of Brawn on top of some chips left to melt,,,,yum yum!

            My late MiL a Brummie used to love Haslet,,see it on the market not yet tried it.

            P&O sometimes have a starter in the MDR of a slice Black Pudding with a piece of streaky bacon and a poached egg on top,,absolutely delicious.

            Whats ‘Udder’?

            udder
            /ˈʌdə/
            noun
            1. the mammary gland of female cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and related animals, having two or more teats and hanging between the hind legs of the animal.
            How could that description not temp you!
            JC
            Hi JC

            I have eaten Haslet in a sandwich - it was OK.

            Next time you are in Shetland, visit one of the local hostelries, they do a starter of Haggis, BP(stornoway) and White Pudding.

            Annie

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jc, liverpool View Post
              Hi Annie
              Right on cue just for you,,,,,,there is only one Black Pudding and it is from Bury all the rest are poor imitations.
              974778E1-9B04-4876-860A-E900CB78E08A.jpeg
              It has to be the sausage,,,boiled,,not the sliced ,,fried.

              It must be the Northerner in me but I love Black Pudding,..and Tripe (honeycombed to soak up the vinegar).
              How about a slice of ‘Udder’ on a sandwich or a slice of Brawn on top of some chips left to melt,,,,yum yum!

              My late MiL a Brummie used to love Haslet,,see it on the market not yet tried it.

              P&O sometimes have a starter in the MDR of a slice Black Pudding with a piece of streaky bacon and a poached egg on top,,absolutely delicious.

              Whats ‘Udder’?

              udder
              /ˈʌdə/
              noun
              1. the mammary gland of female cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and related animals, having two or more teats and hanging between the hind legs of the animal.
              How could that description not temp you!
              JC
              JC
              I am starting to feel ill...

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by sandraggg, Newcastle View Post

                JC
                I am starting to feel ill...
                Hi Sandra
                What about this one,,,,the best of all worlds.
                Steak Guinness and Black Pudding pie.

                https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...VNQD2p-LTugy_8
                JC
                C P Scott,,,,,"Comment is Free,,but Facts are Sacred"
                "You are entitled to your opinion. But you are not entitled to your own facts.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jc, liverpool View Post
                  Hi Sandra
                  What about this one,,,,the best of all worlds.
                  Steak Guinness and Black Pudding pie.

                  https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...VNQD2p-LTugy_8
                  JC
                  No.

                  Black pudding and Guinness... what did I do to offend you today?!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    OH loves tripein fact will eat anything, chitterling, faggots, kidneys, hearts etc etc but will not touch Avocado, he is weird!so long as sunday is proper food i.e cooked breakfast and a sunday roast he is a happy man................. One thing I cannot stand the smell of is stewalthough I love a lovely ox cheek casserole,hugs to all x enjoy your dinner x

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ev'n'clive, HENGOED View Post
                      OH loves tripein fact will eat anything, chitterling, faggots, kidneys, hearts etc etc but will not touch Avocado, he is weird!so long as sunday is proper food i.e cooked breakfast and a sunday roast he is a happy man................. One thing I cannot stand the smell of is stewalthough I love a lovely ox cheek casserole,hugs to all x enjoy your dinner x
                      JC's pie is starting to look distinctly appealing.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jc, liverpool View Post
                        Hi Annie
                        Right on cue just for you,,,,,,there is only one Black Pudding and it is from Bury all the rest are poor imitations.
                        974778E1-9B04-4876-860A-E900CB78E08A.jpeg
                        It has to be the sausage,,,boiled,,not the sliced ,,fried.

                        It must be the Northerner in me but I love Black Pudding,..and Tripe (honeycombed to soak up the vinegar).
                        How about a slice of ‘Udder’ on a sandwich or a slice of Brawn on top of some chips left to melt,,,,yum yum!

                        My late MiL a Brummie used to love Haslet,,see it on the market not yet tried it.

                        P&O sometimes have a starter in the MDR of a slice Black Pudding with a piece of streaky bacon and a poached egg on top,,absolutely delicious.

                        Whats ‘Udder’?

                        udder
                        /ˈʌdə/
                        noun
                        1. the mammary gland of female cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and related animals, having two or more teats and hanging between the hind legs of the animal.
                        How could that description not temp you!
                        JC
                        Although not a connoisseur I adore black pudding [M&S sell it], and I had a Northern Grandmother so I say yum to Tripe [cold, soused in vinegar, Honeycomb and thick Seam], Elder [Udder], and I'll toss in Cow heel too. My grandmother always added cow heels to her stews and home made soups.

                        Loch Fyne used to do amazing Black pudding and Scallops dish and my first breakfast on board is always fried egg, American bacon and black pudding.

                        Then I get healthy and have fruit after that. Final breakfast is the same as the first.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          My Dad was a butcher so I tried most meat and offal as a kid but never tripe. I'm guessing that my Mum would not have known what to do with it (she was a dreadful cook).

                          My OH says he would love to eat stuffed heart again but can't see them in the supermarket, which pleases me because I'm not keen.

                          My daughters introduced me to black pudding, which they often eat if it's on a breakfast menu. I admit that I was pleasantly surprised.
                          Jill

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Smith7 View Post
                            My Dad was a butcher so I tried most meat and offal as a kid but never tripe. I'm guessing that my Mum would not have known what to do with it (she was a dreadful cook).

                            My OH says he would love to eat stuffed heart again but can't see them in the supermarket, which pleases me because I'm not keen.

                            My daughters introduced me to black pudding, which they often eat if it's on a breakfast menu. I admit that I was pleasantly surprised.
                            Wow, a trip down memory lane here.
                            Sheep's [lamb I think to be correct] Heart with sage and onion stuffing. REALLY tasty.

                            Apart from black pud, not had any of these offal [that's offal not awful, Sandra ] dishes for years.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              There's a fair bit of affection for offal on this thread!

                              Growing up, we were quite poor and money was tight, so we often had cheaper things to eat. I quite liked liver but much of the other stuff I couldn't stomach.

                              One thing that we had frequently was fresh fish. I grew up in a fishing port and there were several fresh fish shops. Every Saturday we joined a large queue to buy some. There were so many types, and they were all really cheap. My dad used to enjoy cooking it and he also made the best fishcakes ever.

                              Our cat refused to eat anything other than steamed fish.

                              Comment


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