• Ahoy there! Why not join the UK’s largest cruising forum? The Cruise.co.uk forum is the perfect place to meet and interact with likeminded cruisers to have invaluable conversations. Whether you're a veteran cruiser or looking to set sail on the sea for the first time, everyone is welcome on our forum to participate in the hottest conversations in the cruising world. So, what are you waiting for? Join the forum today by clicking here to register!

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cosmetic enhancement

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Cosmetic enhancement

    I'm starting this thread as a result of reading Gordon's 'NHS Busted' topic.

    Cosmetic surgery can be quite an emotive/scary subject.

    My Mother was born with hooded eyelids which bothered her quite a bit. My sister and I inherited the same feature which we didn't like.
    When Mum died, she left us some money and my sister immediately went to see a cosmetic surgeon to get her eyelids sorted out.
    I was so impressed with the outcome, that I did the same. As my sister is a prize whimp, bless her, I decided that it couldn't have hurt that much and in any case, no pain, no gain. Actually, it really wasn't that sore, although I did look as though I'd gone a couple rounds with Mike Tyson.

    I too, was delighted with the result and was interested to learn that Lord Sugar had hooded eyelids too and had them seen to.

    Have you ever undergone cosmetic surgery? If not, is there anything you would like to have done?
    Jill

    #2
    Originally posted by Smith, Crayford View Post
    ...........................................

    Have you ever undergone cosmetic surgery? If not, is there anything you would like to have done?
    This could be thread worth watching;).

    I'd hazard a guess that we won't hear many admitting to 'enhancement' procedures.

    H

    Comment


      #3
      It's just skin people are having removed, or modified, I am not sure why some people are so judgmental about those wishing to undergo procedures that will improve their appearance.
      AS for enhancements, I feel the same. I don't care what someone does if it makes them feel better about themselves. I class it the same as cosmetics, hair care, cosmetic dentistry and good grooming. There are obvious risks associated with anesthesia and surgery and they assume that risk themselves.
      If you hate the way your eyelids/nose/whatever look- change them!

      Comment


        #4
        It wouldn't bother me if I felt I wanted something done and could afford it , but I think I have passed that stage now and am happy with what I have.CG
        sigpic

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cornish girl, falmouth View Post
          It wouldn't bother me if I felt I wanted something done and could afford it , but I think I have passed that stage now and am happy with what I have.CG
          I too have passed the stage of hoping for any improvement and intend to spend any spare cash enjoying myself.:D

          Since I react very badly to a general anaesthetic I wouldn't consider any kind of elective surgery. I even had my wisdom teeth removed under local anaesthetic (unusual years ago).

          Judith

          Comment


            #6
            Cosmetic surgery? I have a great big yellow streak down my back. That is the only thing stopping me.:D:D

            I have no problem at all with anyone who wants surgery. Grow old disgracefully:D...or is that gracefully ? Just make sure you save up and don't expect what I term 'classic' cosmetic surgery on the NHS.
            Last edited by Mrs M; 26th October 2010, 11:04 AM. Reason: added a paragraph

            Comment


              #7
              If you count tattoos as cosmetic surgery.
              Had my first one 4 years ago when I had just turned 50, I now have 4.
              Totally addictive.

              I appreciate that is not quite the same thing as a boob job, or the one mentioned by the OP but it still is a cosmetic enhancement.

              Comment


                #8
                People are living longer these days and the old saying of three score years and ten is now well below the average life expectancy. The ladies still manage to go on for four years longer than us men, on average and a person attaining the age of 65 can expect to live to well in their eighties - again on average.

                Considering this, many retired people - male and female - look remarkably good for their age. I think that this is because they take trouble with their appearance.

                A simple way of looking better is to smile regularly. A smiling face is so much better to look at than a glum one.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I think it's great that such things are available to those who want them. In my opinion though, some people take things a bit too far and look worse for it.

                  I know I'm a bloke, but I would rather spend the money on a cruise or a new car.

                  Joan Rivers would disagree.............I think it was her who said, 'Better a new face getting out of an old car than an old face getting out of a new car'.

                  Bob......growing old (and bald) naturally.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Not aiming this at anyone particularly and have my tin hat on ready, but there used to be a saying.
                    "You cannot make a Silk Purse, out of a Sow's ear", and judging by some of the so called celebrity's who have had work done, that saying still appears to be true.;)
                    Delboy


                    Photo Albums

                    https://www.flickriver.com/photos/delboyalbums/sets/

                    or

                    https://www.flickr.com/photos/delboyalbums/albums

                    Comment


                      #11
                      That is very true Delboy, Joan Rivers is a prime example of the horrors of plastic surgery.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        As someone who has seen many claims resulting from cosmetic surgery, I have big concerns about how some clinics operate. Some seem to spend little to no time counselling prospective patients before the operations. It is important for surgeons to explore the reasons why an individual wants surgery before undergoing the op as some have deep-seated problems with their perceptions of themselves that could be better sorted out with counselling than with cosmetic surgery. Patients also need to fully understand the general risks of undergoing any surgery - not all do.

                        Sometimes people having breast implants don't realise that they may well need to have them replaced at some stage and don't budget for these additional costs.

                        I have no problem with well-run clinics in the UK catering for the growing need for surgery. I do have a concern about the cheap clinics abroad which offer the surgery as part of your holiday and then pack the patients off home with no line of recourse for them if they suffer problems. The NHS often has to pick up the pieces in these instances.

                        My only claim to vanity is having my hair highlighted. My body is far from perfect but I've had many years to get used to it and would never undergo surgery in pursuit of perfection.
                        Cruising my way through life!

                        Sue

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Do we need lessons in loving ourself as nature intended?

                          Two words - Jocelyn Wildenstein...

                          http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/200...L_800x1132.jpg

                          In all honesty, if you feel that you are 100% sure about what's going to happen to you and have realistic expectations, surgery can have amazing effects - on both appearance and self-esteem. I understand that being so desperately unhappy about how you look can be very life-limiting - if you aren't hurting anyone else then go for it! Although that said, the waitress at our pub has been seriously botoxed and now looks like the most miserable woman you've ever met. Smiling is free!!!!

                          Gem

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Garyorient, Chigwell, Essex View Post
                            If you count tattoos as cosmetic surgery.
                            Had my first one 4 years ago when I had just turned 50, I now have 4.
                            Totally addictive.
                            I'm with you on that ~ got 2 and another 3 in the pipeline (designs are being sorted as we speak). One will be a cover up of my original tattoo that was done far too many years ago and is a bit small and insignificant these days.

                            Can't talk hubby into letting me have my full back done though even though the design is stunning.......

                            As for full on cosmetic surgery I couldn't have most procedures done as my scar tissue forms Keloids and they make my previous (nescessary) surgery scars very unsightly
                            We are all atheists about most of the gods that humanity has ever believed in. Some of us just go one god further.sigpic

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Cruising_Gem, East Anglia View Post
                              Two words - Jocelyn Wildenstein...

                              http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/200...L_800x1132.jpg

                              In all honesty, if you feel that you are 100% sure about what's going to happen to you and have realistic expectations, surgery can have amazing effects - on both appearance and self-esteem. I understand that being so desperately unhappy about how you look can be very life-limiting - if you aren't hurting anyone else then go for it! Although that said, the waitress at our pub has been seriously botoxed and now looks like the most miserable woman you've ever met. Smiling is free!!!!

                              Gem
                              Hi Gem. In all honesty, I can't say that having hooded eyelids made me miserable. It was only when my sister went for it, that I thought that I would quite like it done too and I'm really pleased that I did. I had quite a few compliments afterwards (when the battered look healed).
                              That said, when I was young, my nose was the object of ridicule but I wouldn't have a nose job done or a full face lift.
                              I certainly wouldn't go for Botox but then I'm a smiler by nature.
                              Jill

                              Comment


                              We use cookies to give you the
                              best experience possible.


                              By continuing to use our website you
                              agree to our cookie policy

                              Working...
                              X