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    #31
    I think the poll tax was a tad more unpopular than the TV licence...
    A lot of bitterness towards the BBC has been whipped up by the over 75 issue.
    It was the government who paid for that but by passing the responsibility to the BBC,they skilfully deflected the attention away from themselves.

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
      I don't think ITV has a monopoly on rubbish, the BBC also produces it's share. Our doctors surgery has Victoria Derbyshire on in the mornings and the BBC is now pulling the plug on it.

      There is a limit to how much quality creative talent there is out there and with 24 hour broadcasting from umpteen channels the talent is often spread very thinly indeed.
      My wife is watching a BBC programme at the moment, think the name of the programme says it all ‘Pointless’.😉😄😎
      Delboy


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        #33
        Originally posted by Delboy, Essex View Post

        My wife is watching a BBC programme at the moment, think the name of the programme says it all ‘Pointless’.😉😄😎
        Absolutely!

        Listening to the news this morning it seems my Post #26 is pretty much spot on. Reduce the tv and radio channels and charge a subscription to watch the BBC. There will no doubt be a lot of squealing from the BBC luvvies in the coming years but time for them to wake up and smell the coffee. They don't have a god given right to take money from the people and then broadcast stuff few watch.

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
          Absolutely!

          Listening to the news this morning it seems my Post #26 is pretty much spot on. Reduce the tv and radio channels and charge a subscription to watch the BBC. There will no doubt be a lot of squealing from the BBC luvvies in the coming years but time for them to wake up and smell the coffee. They don't have a god given right to take money from the people and then broadcast stuff few watch.
          As I have previously posted I am not a TV addict, but my wife is.

          She was having her morning cup of coffee today and searching the TV via the remote to find something to watch whilst doing so, all she could find on both the main channels were cooking programmes. Her comment was other than the odd drama, main stream TV has become so third rate, especially at weekends.

          Her main TV viewing is now via streaming services, films or TV from the past ITV3.🤔

          Me, I have my head glued to the iPad via headphones, avoiding the noise of the big black box in the corner.😉🤗😎
          Last edited by Delboy, Essex; 16th February 2020, 10:53 AM.
          Delboy


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            #35
            The whole BBC license fee saga kicks off with the news that 0ver 75's will no longer get free tv licenses, and the tv is for some of them their only companion. They would be lost without their tv and they cannot afford the license fee (about £3 a week).

            So to fix this and teach the BBC a lesson they will be made to become a more expensive subscription service

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by Delboy, Essex View Post

              My wife is watching a BBC programme at the moment, think the name of the programme says it all ‘Pointless’.😉😄😎
              Pointless is the only game show as such, I watch when I'm in and it’s on.

              Comment


                #37
                Originally posted by andyn, Bucks View Post
                The whole BBC license fee saga kicks off with the news that 0ver 75's will no longer get free tv licenses, and the tv is for some of them their only companion. They would be lost without their tv and they cannot afford the license fee (about £3 a week).

                So to fix this and teach the BBC a lesson they will be made to become a more expensive subscription service
                Amazon Prime is about £1.50 per week and include free next day delivery of orders on Amazon and millions of songs on Amazon Music. The scope and scale of Prime tv is amazing. Netflix also costs about £1.50 per week.

                The BBC cannot justify 10+ tv channels, umpteen radio stations, and a vast website that no longer appeal to the majority who have to pay for it. Use it, pay for it. Don’t use it, don’t pay for it.

                My free tv licence will go in June and as far as I can see I will manage perfectly well with Amazon Prime and the various “catchup services”, excluding BBC iPlayer. Having paid for a tv licence for 52 years and had a free one for a year or so I will no longer subsidise the profligacy and arrogance of the no longer non biased BBC.

                Comment


                  #38
                  So why change it, just stop paying the license and go for a subscriprion service. All those crying about the BBC can go wherever they want. But those who like and want to stay with BBC are going to have to stump up more for less

                  and a lot of poor pensioners are going to have to update their tvs, internet and aerial......lot of winners from this just not the pensioners everyone was up in arms about...or maybe they really didn't give a damn but was a good diversionary tactic whiile the government takes shots at the BBC for not betng thei cheerleaders
                  Last edited by andyn, Bucks; 16th February 2020, 12:14 PM.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post

                    Amazon Prime is about £1.50 per week and include free next day delivery of orders on Amazon and millions of songs on Amazon Music. The scope and scale of Prime tv is amazing. Netflix also costs about £1.50 per week.

                    The BBC cannot justify 10+ tv channels, umpteen radio stations, and a vast website that no longer appeal to the majority who have to pay for it. Use it, pay for it. Don’t use it, don’t pay for it.

                    My free tv licence will go in June and as far as I can see I will manage perfectly well with Amazon Prime and the various “catchup services”, excluding BBC iPlayer. Having paid for a tv licence for 52 years and had a free one for a year or so I will no longer subsidise the profligacy and arrogance of the no longer non biased BBC.
                    Do these figures include the cost of broadband??

                    Annie

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by annie, Glasgow View Post

                      Do these figures include the cost of broadband??

                      Annie
                      Does a subscription service have to need broadband? I don't what techie methods are out there.

                      Maybe transmit a scrambled signal and buy an un-scambler of some sort once a year from the BBC just like a tv licence? Maybe keep the licence fee and the BBC relies on/enforces measures to stop avoidance as at presence and cuts it's cloth according to it's income if less people use it's services?

                      Who knows, but in this day and age "use it, pay for it, don't use it, don't pay for it". No organisation has the right to a guaranteed income of about 4.5 billion Pounds pa without satisfying those that pay the money and use it's services.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
                        Does a subscription service have to need broadband? I don't what techie methods are out there.

                        Maybe transmit a scrambled signal and buy an un-scambler of some sort once a year from the BBC just like a tv licence? Maybe keep the licence fee and the BBC relies on/enforces measures to stop avoidance as at presence and cuts it's cloth according to it's income if less people use it's services?

                        Who knows, but in this day and age "use it, pay for it, don't use it, don't pay for it". No organisation has the right to a guaranteed income of about 4.5 billion Pounds pa without satisfying those that pay the money and use it's services.
                        The streaming services you highlighted do require broadband, well I do.

                        The UK is not the only European country which has a TV licence or Broadcast Contribution. In Germany the cost is 18 Euros per household per month and is payable by everyone who uses TV, Radio or internet.

                        You will like this in Spain, public broadcasting is financed by a levy on commercial tv companies and telecommunication companies.

                        Annie
                        Last edited by annie, Glasgow; 16th February 2020, 09:23 PM.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          I've not checked the law today, so maybe things have changed and I have not been aware, but off the top of my head when I worked in the Citizens Advice Bureau between 1995 and 2007 the TV licence was required by anyone having a set in their home, regardless of whether it was on or off, and there was a different licence for Black& white, and colour TV.

                          One reason that stayed in my mind was that a young man came in one day, complaining he had a notice to say he would be taken to court if he didn't buy a licence. when I explained it was a legal requirement he said he would take the plug off the cable and if the BBC van came into his street he could pull the wires out of the socket, and tell them it wasn't connected. I shook my head so he said he would hide it in another room. I had to explain the only way he would not be charged was if he gave his TV set to a neighbour, and he no longer owned one. He reluctantly agreed he would have to buy a licence, and as he was leaving the advising room I mentioned that if his set was for colour, he needed the relevant licence. He looked very unhappy because he'd planned to get the cheaper one.

                          I guess I will have to update my knowledge and find out when the law changed which allows people to watch ITV without the need for any licence. My notice that I will have to get a licence at the end of May came some weeks ago.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            In regards to streaming services this may help.

                            Streaming involves playing a video over an internet connection, either using a web browser or dedicated app, on a wide range of devices. These can include Android and Apple smartphones and tablets, along with laptops, smart TVs, games consoles and internet TV devices, such as Apple TV and Google Chromecast.


                            On some, but not all. Amazon Prime Video, Netflix and Now TV all allow you to download some TV shows and films onto your device to watch while you don't have an internet connection. It's a great feature for enjoying content when you’re offline, such as on holiday or while commuting. If you do want to download content to watch while offline, catch up TV service BBC iPlayer offers this feature. You don't directly pay to use iPlayer, but you will need a valid TV licence.

                            Without a licence, you can legally watch:
                            • Netflix.
                            • YouTube.
                            • Amazon Prime.
                            • DVDs/Blurays.
                            • Non-BBC catch-up including ITV Player, Channel 4 on-demand, as long as it's NOT live.


                            The law says you need to be covered by a TV Licence to:
                            • watch or record programmes as they’re being shown on TV, on any channel
                            • watch or stream programmes live on an online TV service (such as ITV Hub, All 4, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video, Now TV, Sky Go, etc.)
                            • download or watch any BBC programmes on iPlayer.

                            This applies to any device you use, including a TV, desktop computer, laptop, mobile phone, tablet, games console, digital box or DVD/VHS recorder.

                            Live TV means any programme you watch or record as it’s being shown on TV or live on an online TV service. It’s not just live events like sport, news and music. It also covers soaps, series, documentaries and even movies.

                            An online TV service is any streaming or smart TV service, website or app that lets you watch live TV over the internet. This includes services like All 4, Sky Go, Virgin Media, Now TV, BT TV, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video and ITV Hub.

                            Don't forget, a TV Licence also covers you to download or watch BBC programmes on iPlayer – live, catch up or on demand on your television, laptop, mobile phone or any other device.
                            Last edited by Delboy, Essex; 17th February 2020, 09:03 AM.
                            Delboy


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                              #44
                              Originally posted by Mariers2, Rushden View Post
                              I've not checked the law today, so maybe things have changed and I have not been aware, but off the top of my head when I worked in the Citizens Advice Bureau between 1995 and 2007 the TV licence was required by anyone having a set in their home, regardless of whether it was on or off, and there was a different licence for Black& white, and colour TV.

                              One reason that stayed in my mind was that a young man came in one day, complaining he had a notice to say he would be taken to court if he didn't buy a licence. when I explained it was a legal requirement he said he would take the plug off the cable and if the BBC van came into his street he could pull the wires out of the socket, and tell them it wasn't connected. I shook my head so he said he would hide it in another room. I had to explain the only way he would not be charged was if he gave his TV set to a neighbour, and he no longer owned one. He reluctantly agreed he would have to buy a licence, and as he was leaving the advising room I mentioned that if his set was for colour, he needed the relevant licence. He looked very unhappy because he'd planned to get the cheaper one.

                              I guess I will have to update my knowledge and find out when the law changed which allows people to watch ITV without the need for any licence. My notice that I will have to get a licence at the end of May came some weeks ago.
                              Things have changed. As I understand it you only need a tv licence if you watch programmes as they are being transmitted on terrestrial channels, e.g. BBC, ITV, etc. and "live" events on subscription services and/or if you watch BBC iPlayer on any device. I don't know about many of the countless other channels the tv finds these days.

                              You do not need a tv licence if you watch "catchup" services such as ITV Hub, UKTV Player etc. or subscription services such as Netflix, Prime etc.

                              There are some 27.8 million households in the country and I read today 25.6 million tv licences. Thus 2.2 million households do not have a licence. Make of that what you will!

                              I wonder, does your letter telling you that you will need to get a licence at the end of May explain the circumstances in which a licence is not required? I suspect not and all currently with free licences will be subject to a sustained campaign of bullying to "persuade" them to get one.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post

                                Things have changed. As I understand it you only need a tv licence if you watch programmes as they are being transmitted on terrestrial channels, e.g. BBC, ITV, etc. and "live" events on subscription services and/or if you watch BBC iPlayer on any device. I don't know about many of the countless other channels the tv finds these days.

                                You do not need a tv licence if you watch "catchup" services such as ITV Hub, UKTV Player etc. or subscription services such as Netflix, Prime etc.

                                There are some 27.8 million households in the country and I read today 25.6 million tv licences. Thus 2.2 million households do not have a licence. Make of that what you will!

                                I wonder, does your letter telling you that you will need to get a licence at the end of May explain the circumstances in which a licence is not required? I suspect not and all currently with free licences will be subject to a sustained campaign of bullying to "persuade" them to get one.
                                Thank you so much for that information.
                                My letter aimply advised me of the date when I would need to pay the fee, and it included advice that if I claimed any benefit like Pension Credit or disability benefits I would be exempt.

                                When you consider that a large percentage of the ones who previously obtained the "bounty" of a free licence are the ones who only watch the terrestrial programmes,as they may not understand modern technology or be interested in the type of programmes available on "catch-ups. The irony is that a large amount of programmes on the BBc and ITV are not exactly live, but repeats made in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. and are shown on several stations in the course of a week.

                                It's probably a last ditch effort to get as much as possible out of those who don't have as many years left on the planet, and haven't found a way to take it with them when they go.If they can't see or hear much it won't be worth them having a TV set. Mind you, it might be a laugh in the retirement homes,with the inmates arguing whether to have a "free" or "pay" programme on.

                                Comment


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