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Jane fans on now, compilation C5

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    Jane fans on now, compilation C5

    Says new, but old stuff.

    The funny bits... Might be some Jane drinking...

    19:30-21:00

    Jane probably needs some income.

    Might hit catchup.

    Think this link might work.

    ​​​​​​​https://www.channel5.com/show/cruisi...ships-giggles/

    #2
    VJ Day 75 for me.

    Comment


      #3
      Live comedy at The Stand Glasgow for me..

      Comment


        #4
        Guess what we’re watching in our house? Football! Man City v Lyon. I’m just so thrilled. Not. 😐

        Take care and stay well. Helen

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Mason, Altrincham View Post
          Guess what we’re watching in our house? Football! Man City v Lyon. I’m just so thrilled. Not. 😐

          Take care and stay well. Helen
          Poor you.
          I guess having lived in Malaysia, I feel part of anything to do with the area. We often visited Singapore and the history of the area is 'part' of me.
          I was lucky enough to visit Changi thirty odd years ago and saw the museum, which is closed to the public now, in situ. We often visited Kranji Memorial, with visitors.

          Comment


            #6
            My uncle John was captured when Singapore surrendered.
            He never slept with the light off and had terrible nightmares.
            He also never took his shirt off in company due to his back being a mass of scars from the lashings they got from the guards for not working hard enough.
            The Japanese hated them for surrendering.
            The only thing he ever said was he was one of the lucky ones as somehow he survived.
            A big old softie who had no hatred for his captors.

            At peace now.

            Garf
            Last edited by Garfield, Waterlooville; 15th August 2020, 08:27 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Garfield, Waterlooville View Post
              My uncle John was captured when Singapore surrendered.
              He never slept with the light off and had terrible nightmares.
              He also never took his shirt off in company due to his back being a mass of scars from the lashings they got from the guards for not working hard enough.
              The Japanese hated them for surrendering.
              The only thing he ever said was he was one of the lucky ones as somehow he survived.
              A big old softie who had no hatred for his captors.

              At peace now.

              Garf
              The horrors of war in Asia should never be forgotten. Your uncle was/is remarkable. I know some who even now who cannot forgive the cruelty meted out to their relations.
              The BBC has produced a lovely celebration for VJ75

              Edit
              Correction, not lovely, magnificent.
              Last edited by Mrs M; 15th August 2020, 09:03 PM.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Mrs M View Post

                Poor you.
                I guess having lived in Malaysia, I feel part of anything to do with the area. We often visited Singapore and the history of the area is 'part' of me.
                I was lucky enough to visit Changi thirty odd years ago and saw the museum, which is closed to the public now, in situ. We often visited Kranji Memorial, with visitors.
                I don't watch Jane McDonald but I did watch the VJ commemoration.

                I was emotionally drained at the end of the programme but glad I watched it. I thought there whole thing was extremely well produced and performed. I loved the music of course and was impressed by the technology that went into the imagery and sound, all to great effect.

                Joanna Lumley was her usual professional self as a presenter but those that survived the war in the Far East and spoke to us all, were what made the production so poignant.

                Oddly enough Mrs M. I am reading the book you recommended called The Glass Palace and have just reached the part where the Japanese invaded Malaya.

                Just as with the Holocaust, we should never forget the horrors of the war with Japan.
                Jill

                Comment


                  #9
                  Did not watch any TV last night, was at our daughters for a family roast dinner get together, followed by watching our grandchildren enjoying themselves in the hot tub.
                  Delboy


                  Photo Albums

                  https://www.flickriver.com/photos/delboyalbums/sets/

                  or

                  https://www.flickr.com/photos/delboyalbums/albums

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Mum was born August 15th, her initials were VJ

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Garfield, Waterlooville View Post
                      My uncle John was captured when Singapore surrendered.
                      He never slept with the light off and had terrible nightmares.
                      He also never took his shirt off in company due to his back being a mass of scars from the lashings they got from the guards for not working hard enough.
                      The Japanese hated them for surrendering.
                      The only thing he ever said was he was one of the lucky ones as somehow he survived.
                      A big old softie who had no hatred for his captors.

                      At peace now.

                      Garf
                      I had an uncle who was a POW and worked on the Burma railway. He never spoke about it.

                      Annie

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Many years ago our son had to do a project on WWII for his history class in High School. The students were asked to speak to an elderly relative or neighbour about their experiences during the war. Andrew spoke to our lovely neighbour Brian who it turns out was raised in Malaysia and ended up in a civilian prisoner of war camp there with his family. Our son was blown away by his recollections as we had never heard anything before that to indicate what he and his family had suffered. Brian was one of life’s true gentlemen and he is still missed by all who knew him on our road.

                        Take care and stay well. Helen

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Garfield, Waterlooville View Post
                          My uncle John was captured when Singapore surrendered.
                          He never slept with the light off and had terrible nightmares.
                          He also never took his shirt off in company due to his back being a mass of scars from the lashings they got from the guards for not working hard enough.
                          The Japanese hated them for surrendering.
                          The only thing he ever said was he was one of the lucky ones as somehow he survived.
                          A big old softie who had no hatred for his captors.

                          At peace now.

                          Garf
                          Dating from feudal times the Japanese believed there were only two outcomes in battle. Victory or death. Surrender was dishonourable and not an option. Hence the rise of "seppuku, ritual suicide by disembowelment, by defeated warriors to avoid falling into enemy hands and to attenuate shame and avoid possible torture.

                          Those who surrendered were beneath contempt and had no value, hence the treatment of captured Allied soldiers. Of course not all soldiers were fully signed up to what we regard as the mistreatment of prisoners but it was obey orders from on high or else.

                          From my time in Japan the people were the most polite, courteous and helpful of any people I have met anywhere. There were certainly no discernible "warrior" or "cruel" traits anywhere.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Hi all
                            A true story...I used to work with a guy who spent his time on the Burma Railway.

                            When he finally got back home he was 6 stone wet through,,within minutes of walking through the front door his mother cried “Oh Paddy look at the state of you I’ll make you something to eat that’ll put the meat back on your bones”.

                            A little later she came from the kitchen with a great steaming bowl of ‘rice pudding

                            Paddy threw the rice pudding at the wall and went to the pub.

                            A real character was Paddy I don’t think he ever bought a pint himself,a real storyteller.

                            In later years he became known as a ‘professional mourner’ he went to a funeral every day,,some said it was just for the buffet after.
                            ​​​​​​​JC

                            Last edited by jc, liverpool; 16th August 2020, 11:32 AM.
                            C P Scott,,,,,"Comment is Free,,but Facts are Sacred"
                            "You are entitled to your opinion. But you are not entitled to your own facts.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by JohnR, Chippenham View Post
                              Dating from feudal times the Japanese believed there were only two outcomes in battle. Victory or death. Surrender was dishonourable and not an option. Hence the rise of "seppuku, ritual suicide by disembowelment, by defeated warriors to avoid falling into enemy hands and to attenuate shame and avoid possible torture.

                              Those who surrendered were beneath contempt and had no value, hence the treatment of captured Allied soldiers. Of course not all soldiers were fully signed up to what we regard as the mistreatment of prisoners but it was obey orders from on high or else.

                              From my time in Japan the people were the most polite, courteous and helpful of any people I have met anywhere. There were certainly no discernible "warrior" or "cruel" traits anywhere.
                              I had quite a few lovely Japanese friends whilst in KL and we frequently meet a wonderful couple on QV.

                              I don't think anyone [with no WW2 memories to harbour] equates the psyche of a Japanese warrior with, as you say, the polite and courteous Japanese citizen of today.

                              Comment


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