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Famous old ships.

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    Famous old ships.

    I often see old sailing ships at anchor or on courtesy calls in Falmouth, and I wondered how many poster's recall these ships either in their home ports or through reading up on them.

    I recall being told by my grandfer about the magnificent tea clipper the Cutty Sark, she was anchored in the Carrick Roads in Falmouth from 1923-1936 , she was bought by a sailing enthusiast when her sailing days we over.

    She was the fastest tea clipper at that time and her most famous master was Captain Woodget, a good captain and fearless commander.

    In order to catch the Roaring Forties Trade winds encountering some of the most violent gales and seas, Woodget would travel further than any of her other masters.

    Cutty Sark in 1889 was involved in a famous incident with the crack PO steamship Britannia.

    Britannia was doing 14.5 to 16 knots and was overhauled by the Cutty Sark doing a good 17 knots, this was recorded in the Britannia's log 'sailing ship overhauled and passed us.!!

    An apprentice (aged 15) wrote to his mother that 'Captain Woodget kept vicious collie dogs' and they ate such food as' Salt Tram Horse' 'Leu pies' and 'Junk and Spuds'.

    She was taken to Greenhithe where she was a training ship before being taken over in 1954 by the Cutty Sark Society who restored her and she was transferred to Greenwich.

    Unfortunately she was badly damaged by fire in 2007 , but has been fully restored, although there is still no access to the ship yet.
    .
    Here is an old photo I came across taken while she was in Falmouth, she certainly was a beauty. CG

    Last edited by cornish girl, falmouth; 9th July 2011, 07:38 PM.
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    #2
    Dont have any photos,but remember seeing the PAMIR off the coast of south America sometime in 1953.I also saw a film taken on board showing how rough life was ,disputes were settled by bare knuckle fight on deck.

    jim

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      #3
      Famous old ships.

      Sorry I tried to get this one of her in full sail in the ist post but wouldn't fit CG
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        #4
        Originally posted by jimtheoldsalt, felixstowe View Post
        Dont have any photos,but remember seeing the PAMIR off the coast of south America sometime in 1953.I also saw a film taken on board showing how rough life was ,disputes were settled by bare knuckle fight on deck.

        jim
        Hi Jim I remeber the Pamir when they visited in Falmouth I was 15 then , I also remember she went down with all the crew not so many years after.CG
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          #5
          Wonderful ships CG. I remember being taken up to Berry Head by my father in 1956 to see the Tall Ships gather for the first ever Tall Ships Race. There were about twenty ship - some were berthed in Torbay at anchor and others were at Dartmouth.
          Somewhere I have some old black and white photo's which I must look out. Very grainy and not very clear as the day was awful, Fog, rain and Easterly winds.
          Some of them came back for the 50th Anniversary in 2006, The Christian Raddich, Falken, Sorlandt, Geroge Stage and Provident so I was able to get much better pictures - close up and a bit too personal as, once again, it was foggy and blowing a hooley and we were out in the middle of them all.
          There was another Tall Ships Race in October 2005 - beautiful weather for the courtesy time here but on the day of the race start.............yep, fog and high winds. It's getting beyond a joke now......but, if anyone wants to see pictures of Tall Ships, mainly at anchor I must admit............I have lots of them.

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            #6
            Originally posted by cornish girl, falmouth View Post
            I often see old sailing ships at anchor or on courtesy calls in Falmouth, and I wondered how many poster's recall these ships either in their home ports or through reading up on them.
            Good topic CG and topical for me as I joined the RN as a Boy (15) at a Boy's shore training establishment in Gosport (Hants) HMS ST VINCENT, its predecessor was a 3 masted "First Rate" man o' war which was often photographed with HMS VICTORY in Pompey harbour. In 1906 it was towed away for scrapping. Recently I was sent a newspaper cutting and photo of this degrading process which took place in FALMOUTH! Small world isn't it Cornishgirl? Admiral Jervis was the Commander in Chief at the Battle of Cape St Vincent, a famous victory during which a young Nelson learnt some of the tricks of his trade. Admiral Jervis was created Earl St Vincent and the first Boys training ship was named after him because of his strong belief in disciplined training. I'll find a photo or two later.

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              #7
              Hi Sandie I have seen three Tall ships races from Falmouth now , the last one being the Falmouth to Lisbon leg, when I was lucky enough to be out on the Falmouth tug Percuil (my son is the engineer on her) we had a glorious day on Her, the tug was working and had to untie all the tall ships in the docks towing them out.
              The Mexican ship had all the cadets spread out on the masts singing, the race took place out at St Antony's head with the Russian ship the Sedov starting the race, if you have never seen these great ships in full sail you're missing a treat. it was magnificent!!
              I remember seeing the Christian Radditch in Falmouth at different times, we also took the old Saga Rose out , as she was following the race. I also have so many photos I have collected over the years, brings back great memories. CG
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                #8
                Tucked away somewhere I have a memorial copy of the greenoch Telegraph with photos of the tall ships when they stopped there a few years ago,must look it up and try and keep this thread going.

                jim

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                  #9
                  Hi Darby It is so sad the way some of these old ships end up, they should be saved. We had the HMS Ganges here as a training ship, then the Sheer water ,CG
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                    #10
                    Originally posted by cornish girl, falmouth View Post
                    Hi Darby It is so sad the way some of these old ships end up, they should be saved. We had the HMS Ganges here as a training ship, then the Sheer water ,CG
                    HMS ganges was a stone frigate at Shotley in Suffolk with one of the tallest masts around.
                    I was at a sea school about 5 miles down the road and we used to go down to ganges to use their swimming pool and climb the mast,and we played all their divisions at cricket and rugby,a few of our boys joined the RN via ganges.

                    jim

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by jimtheoldsalt, felixstowe View Post
                      HMS ganges was a stone frigate at Shotley in Suffolk with one of the tallest masts around.
                      I was at a sea school about 5 miles down the road and we used to go down to ganges to use their swimming pool and climb the mast,and we played all their divisions at cricket and rugby,a few of our boys joined the RN via ganges.

                      jim
                      Too true Jim, HMS GANGES was HMS ST VINCENT's "Northern" equivalent. Its predecessor was a similar 3 masted "First Rate" sailing ship also. The stone frigate's claim to fame was that its mast was a couple of inches bigger than ours! It is still there although the establishment closed in 1976.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by DarbyRN, Lee-on-the-Solent View Post
                        Too true Jim, HMS GANGES was HMS ST VINCENT's "Northern" equivalent. Its predecessor was a similar 3 masted "First Rate" sailing ship also. The stone frigate's claim to fame was that its mast was a couple of inches bigger than ours! It is still there although the establishment closed in 1976.
                        As aboy I have been up and over futtock shrouds,tho must admit to going thru the lubbers hole the firtst couple of times up.

                        jim

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                          #13
                          Famous old ships.

                          I have just been reading the history of the Old Ganges, she was the training ship for boys and was in Falmouth from1886-1899, (some very cruel practices went on there) she then transferred to Harwich still as training ship until 1905, which then continued at Shotley until 1976.
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                            #14
                            HI Jim but did you ever get to be button boy? regards CG
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                              #15
                              Originally posted by cornish girl, falmouth View Post
                              HI Jim but did you ever get to be button boy? regards CG
                              certainly NOT,frightened the life out of me looking up there,anyway we were not allowed up that far,that was for Ganges boys only. We only went down there for character building and To be put thru PT by their hard nosed PT instructors ,but I loved going down there.

                              jim

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