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Reykjavik Cruises

Whether you’re interested in whale watching, soaking in geothermal hot springs, or indulging in a bit of retail therapy, Reykjavik won’t disappoint! This Icelandic capital is the northernmost, westernmost, and possibly quirkiest capital city in Europe. Its friendly residents love to make the most of non-stop daylight during the summer to engage in a bit of revelry, and this boisterous spirit warms up cold, dark winter days as well in cosy pubs and international music festivals. From Viking museums to traditional fishing homes, there’s plenty of sights to keep you busy in this colourful port.

Reykjavik, Iceland

What You Need To Know About Reykjavik

How to reach Reykjavik from the cruise terminal?

Smaller cruise ships will dock right in Reykjavik’s Old Harbour, which is within walking distance from most of its main sights. The city is compact and walkable, but if you prefer there’s also a hop-on, hop-off tour bus on hand to shuttle you around town! If you’re cruising to Iceland in a larger ship, you will arrive slightly outside of the city. In this case, look for free shuttle services provided by your cruise line, or hire a taxi to get into the city centre. You’ll find taxis on hand both at the dock as well as queued up by the central tourist office.

What are the can’t-miss sights in Reykjavik?

Reykjavik’s Old Town gives you an overview of the city’s history and culture. It’s best explored on foot, allowing you to see the street art, sculptures and historic wooden homes around the harbour. One of the city’s most striking landmarks is the modern Hallgrimskirkja Church, with its unusual shape and lofty interior designed by state architect Gudjon Samuelsson. Venture inside and you can take a lift up to the tower to admire the views. Reykjavik Art Museum is split into three locations, the most central of which is the contemporary wing Hafnarhus. There’s also Kjarvalsstadir for more traditional paintings and sculpture, or you can visit the Sveinsson Sculpture Museum and Park.

Typical food and restaurants in Reykjavik?

Fresh seafood, free range lamb and an abundance of green herbs help make Icelandic cuisine particularly delicious. Reykjavik offers a treasure trove of restaurants to explore, with more unusual items including horse meat and puffin popping up from time to time on the menus here. Don’t miss the thick, yogurt Skyr served with berries, or the rugbraud rye bread. One of the best restaurants is located in the Old Harbour’s Saga Museum, dishing up traditional dishes with a fresh, modern slant. Try cod, halibut and lamb served in inventive small plates here. And for street food, you can’t beat a fresh hot dog from the food stands near the harbour!

REYKJAVIK EXPERTS

We have over 130 expert cruise consultants to help you book the perfect cruise. Many have first hand experience of Reykjavik and you can find some of their best tips and advice below.
Cruise Expert Warwick Van Reenen

Warwick Van Reenen

Reykjavik

Reykjavik. Iceland’s capital is the world’s northernmost capital city and has a natural beauty which includes waterfalls, mountains, hot springs and glaciers.

REYKJAVIK - DID YOU KNOW?

After you’ve learned all about Vikings and Icelandic folklore at the Saga Museum, why not visit the Reykjavik Settlement Museum? It’s located underground, inspired on a traditional Viking-era longhouse in its striking design. You’ll find an array of interactive displays on hand here to help you imagine what it was like for early settlers here. Many visitors use Reykjavik as their jumping-off point for getting out into the Icelandic countryside, particularly the famous Golden Circle. The circle includes three main attractions: the Gullfoss waterfalls, Thingvellir national park, and the Strokkur geyser. The Blue Lagoon is located 40 minutes away from central Reykjavik, but it should definitely be put at the top of your to-do list when visiting this port! You’ll pass through otherworldly lava fields to get there, and once you’ve arrived, you’ll find steaming pools of milky blue water to bathe in. Rich with natural minerals, it’s said that the water and mud has healing powers. Book a massage or skin treatment in the adjoining spa while you’re at it. Head to Puffin Island if you want to see these iconic birds. You can take the ‘Puffin Express’ during the summer, which takes you right up to their colonies for picture-perfect photo opportunities.


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