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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Are ships getting too big?

    We have just finished a cruise on our first 3000+ ship.

    IT IS TOO BIG

    It was on the INDEPENDENCE from Southampton.
    On the way out and on most of the 'sea' days the wind across the deck was so strong there were few people on the deck.
    The result was vast overcrowding of the other areas.

    Coming out of the second sitting dinner or show there was NO chance of a group of six getting seats together in any of the popular bars.
    You didn't get a lot of chance to meet people as it was different people every time you sat down anywhere.
    Even sharing a taxi coming back to the ship was a bit strange as again you did not recognise faces etc.

    Don't get me wrong, the cruise was good, but some of the friendliness between gusts and staff was missing, (and between guests)


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Are ships getting too big?

    Quote QUOTE: View Post
    We have just finished a cruise on our first 3000+ ship.

    IT IS TOO BIG...
    Are ships getting too big?

    Well, the big ones are too big for us - but keep 'em coming! If cruise prices are subject to the law of supply and demand, it's better for customers when supply outstrips demand.


  3. #3
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    The size of ship and passenger numbers is not directly related to overcrowding. I know that sounds daft, but let me explain. I was recently on Oasis of the Seas the worlds biggest ship carrying up to 6000 passengers. Yet she is one of the more spacious ships I have ever been on more spacious than many smaller ships, carrying a sixth of the passenger, for example. Embarkation took 15 minutes, quicker than ships a fraction of her size.

    For the mathematician heres: if you divide the ships passenger capacity by the gross tonnage (which is not a measurement of weight, but internal volume) you get a space ratio. The bigger the number, the more space per passenger. For example, Fred Olsens Braemar has a ratio of 28:1. However Oasis has a space ratio of 36:1. So Oasis has more spacious!

    By the way, Premium ships tend to have more space, thats what you pay for. For example, the QM2 is only slightly smaller (in terms of internal volume) than IOS but often carries 1000 less passengers. Her space ratio is around 55:1.

    I don't think the problem with IOS was that she is too big, it is the fact that she was designed for the warm Caribbean climates. This means that the deck space can normally be fully utilised unlike ex-UK cruses, making the interiors more crowded. The QM2 was designed for the often cold North Atlantic so her interior spaces can handle the full passenger compliment well, even in a storm.


  4. #4
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    I have not been on any of the Freedom Class ships (IOTS) and have no real urge to do so, but I am a fan of the Voyager Class.

    The trick Malcolm has missed is that The Windjammer, The Royal Prom, The Theatre, The Ice Rink are exactly the same size on both classes of ship, so no need to queue for the shows to get a seat, queue for tickets, roam around the WJ with cold plates of food or get crushed in the Prom on Grand Parade nights.

    You miss out on the Flowrider and the H2o zone and a 1000+ more people scrambling for the same space.

    Wilba

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Quote QUOTE: View Post
    The size of ship and passenger numbers is not directly related to overcrowding....

    ...For the mathematician heres: if you divide the ships passenger capacity by the gross tonnage (which is not a measurement of weight, but internal volume) you get a space ratio. The bigger the number, the more space per passenger. For example, Fred Olsens Braemar has a ratio of 28:1. However Oasis has a space ratio of 36:1. So Oasis has more spacious!...
    I remember thinking, "That's daft!" when I first came across this method of calculating the 'Passenger Space Ratio' in the Berlitz Guide.

    Gross tonnage IS NOT a measurement of internal volume! Imagine if the superstructure was made from polystyrene - you could have a ship a mile high with a huge internal volume for the same mass (or 'weight' if you prefer).

    Gross tonnage is related to the volume of water the ship displaces, and is therefore related to the volume of the ship below the water line.

    The 'spaciousness' of a ship is not something to calculate (there are far too many variables); it is something to experience.

    Black Watch is the most spacious ship I've been on, while Ventura seemed the most crowded. The Berlitz Guide gives them an almost identical passenger to space ratio.


    (Black Watch. Now that's what I call space!)

    Finally, let's not forget passenger behaviour. What happens if 6000 people all want to do the same thing at the same time? ;)


  6. #6
    MarieC, Troon Guest
    Quote from Petemac's post:On the way out and on most of the 'sea' days the wind across the deck was so strong there were few people on the deck.
    The result was vast overcrowding of the other areas.

    I do think that this is also significant about your experience Petemac.

    We were on Grand Princess in April this year and the weather wasn't great, strong winds as you describe. On sea days not many people were using the sun decks and so the inside lounges and particularly the Horizon court buffet were much more crowded during the day. It was difficult to get a table in the buffet at certain times as people were using the tables to read, play cards or just gaze at the waves. As we had been on the same ship last year in better weather we did notice a difference.

    We have also been on IOTS in better weather and although there obviously were more passengers we never felt it was as overcrowded as you did so again I do think that the weather probably did make it a different experience than it could have been for you.






  7. #7
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    Quote QUOTE: View Post
    Are ships getting too big?

    Well, the big ones are too big for us - but keep 'em coming! If cruise prices are subject to the law of supply and demand, it's better for customers when supply outstrips demand.
    Too big for us too, but then we are not their target market.

    With regard to tonnage and passenger/space ratio, surely the use of the space is more important? I've never felt over crowded on a small ship.

    Judith


  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I found the explorer too big for me, that's when she was a big ship !

    I prefer 60-90k tonne, anything larger usually contains things that I don't need or want.


  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Wink Ask Dave!

    Quote QUOTE: View Post
    We have just finished a cruise on our first 3000+ ship.

    IT IS TOO BIG
    Ships aren't getting too big.
    You just like messing about in boats! :D ..and may have booked The Wrong Cruise
    (People actually do that from time to time)

    Book Fred.Olsen next time and you'll be much happier!
    ;)
    .

    Cruise Ships - Profile Ticker

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    1,078
    Odd, we seemed to have loads of room on Artemis. We are looking for the bigger ships that give more dining options & things to do, got a bit fed up with sea days in bad weather last cruise too.


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