Cruise Search


Search
robert - Answered a Question by Emma (15 Nov 08 19:10)

Sorry, cant help just looked in Oxford E nglish Dictionary (Latest in my possesion) Must be someone out there that knows. Seems very derogatory to say the least. But you do not seem to fit into that categarory. What a shame that some people have to put people in categories, when they do not even know them.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Blackmore-weston - Answered a Question by Emma (15 Nov 08 19:09)

Chav, Chava or Charva is a derogatory term applied to certain young people in Great Britain. The stereotypical view of a chav is a white agressive teen or young adult, of working class background, who wears branded sports and casual clothing (baseball caps are also common). Often fights and engages in petty criminality and are often assumed to be unemployed or in a low paid job. The term appeared in mainstream dictionaries in 2005.[1][2] There are regional variations; in the North East of England the variant charv / charva is most commonly used (particularly in Newcastle upon Tyne and Sunderland areas), while in the South East of England and South West of England chav is the usual form. The northwest and particularly Liverpool use the word Scally. Similar words in use outside England include "neds" in Scotland, "spides" or "skangers" in Ireland and in Northern Ireland the term "milly" is used. Response to the term has ranged from amusement to criticism that it is a new manifestation of classism.[3] However, it is important to note that chav is not a straight synonym for "working class person", but refers to a specific mode of behaviour, dress and speech that is far from universal amongst the British working class (although for the most part is restricted to it). The term has also been associated with juvenile delinquency, the "ASBO Generation" and "Yob culture". Pikey is a pejorative slang term used, mainly in England, to refer to travellers, Gypsies or people of low social class. More recently it was applied to Irish Travellers and non-Roma Gypsies.[2][3] In the late 20th century, it came to be used to describe "a lower-class person, regarded as coarse or disreputable."[1][4] Pikey's most common contemporary use is not as a term for the Gypsy ethnic group, but as a catch-all phrase to refer to people, of any ethnic group, who travel around with no fixed abode. Pikey is also commonly used to describe someone living in a caravan (not necessarily a Romani) and a "half pikey" is someone who lives in a caravan but owns the land in which it is on.[citation needed] Among English Romani Gypsies the term Pikey refers to a Traveller that is not Romani. In the book In the life of a Romany gypsy, published in 1973 and written by the respectable Romani author Manfri Frederick Wood, the term pikey is used by Romani Gypsies to refer to a member who has been cast out of the family. According to Manfri, if a member of the family is hot headed or a thief or a trouble maker or brings misfortune on the family, then a family council will be held and that member will be cast out of the family and will have to stay out of the way for ever more. They are regarded as never having even been a part of the family.[citation needed] In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the definition became even looser and is sometimes used to refer to a wide section of the (generally urban) underclass of the country, or merely a person of any social class who "lives on the cheap". This seems to be the meaning intended by Stephen Fry in an episode of QI, grouping together "hoodies, pikeys and chavs", and intimating that these people are of a sort who "go out on the town, beating people up and drinking Bacardi Breezers". Negative English attitudes towards "pikeys" were a running joke in the 2000 Guy Ritchie film Snatch. The American terms "trailer trash" and "white trash" are similar in the condescension and disdain with which they are used, though the stereotypes differ in some particulars. Recent examples of the word's use on British television include The Catherine Tate Show and a BBC documentary, "The Class System and Me" about the politician John Prescott.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Emma - replied to Blackmore-weston (15 Nov 08 20:35)

I FEEL SICK! Yes you have answered my request about CHAVS, but if I and many more in my age group and even younger are classed as that! Words fail me! All I can say its DISGUSTING.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Macro - replied to Emma (15 Nov 08 21:10)

You miss the point - have you read the comprehensive answers or are you winding us up? Have you had the expression hurled at you? It has nothing to do with age and everything to do with behaviour, attitude and bad manners etc. In a group of largely well behaved and mannered people on board a cruise liner, these 'types' stand out a mile and often in these instances they feel inferior and therefore do the opposite of the majority(keep a low profile) and are disruptive, aggressive, loud, drunk and make sure they are 'in your face'. This has the tendency to upset the majority especially as they feel powerless to stop the unwelcome 'invasion' of their cruise holiday which they had taken to hopefully ensure that they didn't have to came across these people for a couple of weeks. I hope to have finally answered your question as honestly as possible without some ' .........' having a go at me and labelling me with yet another name you can look up.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Emma - replied to Macro (15 Nov 08 21:40)

No not winding you up. My question was about the comment on the review Riviera romance. A Creighton-moore saying about chavs and pikies. I just wanted to know what he or she was referring to. I didnt know what they were. I think that a lot of passengers on the Ventura were better than what was described. Sorry I offended you.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Macro - replied to Emma (17 Nov 08 07:53)

You didnt offend me. They offend me.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Blackmore-weston - Answered a Question by Emma (15 Nov 08 19:30)

This was taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Chav, Chava or Charva is a derogatory term applied to certain young people in Great Britain. The stereotypical view of a chav is a white agressive teen or young adult, of working class background, who wears branded sports and casual clothing (baseball caps are also common). Often fights and engages in petty criminality and are often assumed to be unemployed or in a low paid job. The term appeared in mainstream dictionaries in 2005.[1][2] There are regional variations; in the North East of England the variant charv / charva is most commonly used (particularly in Newcastle upon Tyne and Sunderland areas), while in the South East of England and South West of England chav is the usual form. The northwest and particularly Liverpool use the word Scally. Similar words in use outside England include "neds" in Scotland, "spides" or "skangers" in Ireland and in Northern Ireland the term "milly" is used. Response to the term has ranged from amusement to criticism that it is a new manifestation of classism.[3] However, it is important to note that chav is not a straight synonym for "working class person", but refers to a specific mode of behaviour, dress and speech that is far from universal amongst the British working class (although for the most part is restricted to it). The term has also been associated with juvenile delinquency, the "ASBO Generation" and "Yob culture". ----------------------- Pikey is a pejorative slang term used, mainly in England, to refer to travellers, Gypsies or people of low social class. Contemporary usage More recently it was applied to Irish Travellers and non-Roma Gypsies.[2][3] In the late 20th century, it came to be used to describe "a lower-class person, regarded as coarse or disreputable."[1][4] Pikey's most common contemporary use is not as a term for the Gypsy ethnic group, but as a catch-all phrase to refer to people, of any ethnic group, who travel around with no fixed abode. Pikey is also commonly used to describe someone living in a caravan (not necessarily a Romani) and a "half pikey" is someone who lives in a caravan but owns the land in which it is on.[citation needed] Among English Romani Gypsies the term Pikey refers to a Traveller that is not Romani. In the book In the life of a Romany gypsy, published in 1973 and written by the respectable Romani author Manfri Frederick Wood, the term pikey is used by Romani Gypsies to refer to a member who has been cast out of the family. According to Manfri, if a member of the family is hot headed or a thief or a trouble maker or brings misfortune on the family, then a family council will be held and that member will be cast out of the family and will have to stay out of the way for ever more. They are regarded as never having even been a part of the family.[citation needed] In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the definition became even looser and is sometimes used to refer to a wide section of the (generally urban) underclass of the country, or merely a person of any social class who "lives on the cheap". This seems to be the meaning intended by Stephen Fry in an episode of QI, grouping together "hoodies, pikeys and chavs", and intimating that these people are of a sort who "go out on the town, beating people up and drinking Bacardi Breezers". Negative English attitudes towards "pikeys" were a running joke in the 2000 Guy Ritchie film Snatch. The American terms "trailer trash" and "white trash" are similar in the condescension and disdain with which they are used, though the stereotypes differ in some particulars. Recent examples of the word's use on British television include The Catherine Tate Show and a BBC documentary, "The Class System and Me" about the politician John Prescott.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Stanton - Answered a Question by Emma (15 Nov 08 20:18)

Asked a friend (no its not funny) Chavs are supposed to wear track suits, have BIG earings, blonde hair, tied back in pony tail (Preferably on one side) She didnt know about men. Thats all I can say. Cant comment on pikies, no one I spoke to had heard of this. Isnt this a wonderful world (NOT) .

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
Aldrich - replied to Stanton (16 Nov 08 18:13)

And the hair pulled tightly back into a ponytail is commonly known as a 'Croydon Facelift'...

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report
DI WEBB - Answered a Question by Emma (16 Nov 08 00:00)

According to my grandchildren, CHAV stands for Council House And Violent!!!! If I find out what Pikie means I'll let you know.

- Was this comment useful or 0 of 0 found this useful
Comment | Report