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jones - Answered a Question by Owen (08 Aug 07 16:34)

All modern ships are fitted with stabilisers so you do not need to worry.Try to book cabins as near to the middle of the ship if possible to avoid movement.We recently sailed in a cyclone in Darwin and it was not a problem.

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tenson - Answered a Question by Owen (08 Aug 07 17:03)

So are you telling me that what ever size wave or conditions these stabilizers can with stand these conditions, I'm just thinking of the "perfect storm".

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Smith - replied to tenson (14 Aug 09 22:05)

I suffer from sea sickness even in the med when it is just swaying slightly I can feel it. Someone told me to sway with it ie just gently rock from side to side. As its usually in the evening when you are in the theatre for entertainment, people think you are swaying to the music so you don't feel an idiot when you feel the sway as the ship is moving to its next port then. It really works! the feeling passes quite quickly. Otherwise i would have had to take tablets and then I am sooo tired for the next 24 hours its not worth being on vacation! Having said that, the only place i have been that I have felt really sick is on the southampton to the med cruise where you hit that awful part as you ener the med. I prefer to now fly direct to the med and board from there. Ive been on RC, Carnival and OV2 and felt sick on all of them, except on OV2 when I tried the 'swaying'. Toward the end of my hols I didn't even need to do that. I think I am cured!.... hopefully.

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Neil Down - Answered a Question by Owen (08 Aug 07 22:50)

The ships which handle stormy conditions best are the "transatlantic "style ships. Ships like QE2, Saga Rose, Ruby and Pearl and QM2. I think that the Disney ships would too. But even these ships will suffer in a force ten and a lot of people miss breakfast. The modern ships with stabilisers will stand mkoderately well in a good swell but even the biggest move about a bit and rock and roll in anything heavier. There have been several incidents which uphold this view like Oriana crossing the atlantic with stoved in windows and a giant list by one of the Princess ships. Most times the sea is kind and when there are a few lumps around don't look at the horizon but enjoy the magnificence of a good storm. I don't want to frighten anyone away, I cruise at least 3 times a year, because cruising is a wonderful way to get around, just relax the captains have seen it all before. Neil Down.

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Johnstone - Answered a Question by Owen (09 Aug 07 20:57)

I cruise 2-3 times a year and have only once experienced a storm bad enough to put me off eating dinner that night. To be honest it was only bad for about a couple of hours and improved dramatically when they started using the stabilisers. The middle of the ship like the other reviwer said is best. Top deck, at the front you feel the ship moving more when it is rough. It has to be pretty bad though for you to feel ill, mostly its can just be a bit bumpy when it is rough. I find that I find the rocking in a moderate swell quite relaxing especially when I'm going to sleep. To balance out what I've just said, the majority of the times that I've been on a cruise, I would barely have known we were on a ship at sea at all if it hadn't been for the low level noise from the negine and seeing the ocean go past when I looked out the window otherwise I'd have thought I was in a big hotel. Don't let fear of rough seas put you off trying a cruise - it is a fantastic experience.Give it a go, I'm sure you'll love it .

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Woolley - Answered a Question by Owen (10 Aug 07 18:14)

My late husband was a chief engineer in the merchant navy & his advice was try and get a cabin on one of the decks in the middle of the ship. He also suggested an inside cabin then you would not know what the weather was like.

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Low - Answered a Question by Owen (10 Aug 07 20:07)

The larger ships are generally more stable.I found the QE11 to be very steady, even on a bit of roughness crossing the Atlantic, as was the Brilliance of the Seas. Depends on where you travel. Around the Med, close to land may be better than an ocean crossing for a first timer. Black Prince wallows a bit, but it is much smaller. Good Luc.

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Blackall - Answered a Question by Owen (10 Aug 07 21:46)

Type your answer here...big ships cope with big seas better than small ones. Even quite big ships can "move" if the swell is from a quarter rather than dead ahead. A "liner bow" makes for a smoother ride that a smoothed cruiser bow - these tend to thump into the swell and occasionally give a really big bang when a wave slams into a hause hole (where the anchor hides) .

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Appleby - Answered a Question by Owen (10 Aug 07 21:49)

I love cruising but am an awful sailor. There is always a risk that you are going to be sea sick whatever the size of ship. We always book a cabin on a low deck near the middle of the ship. I find that lying down is the best way of dealing with feeling sick and use travel wrist bands most of the time. Reception keeps travel sick pills and I take these if I know rough seas are expected.

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Holder - Answered a Question by Owen (10 Aug 07 22:28)

Stabilisers stop the ship 'rocking' from side to side. They do nothing to stop aft/forward pitching. The bigger the ship the less the movement. As other folk say, get in the middle if you're troubled by motion. Ships' doctors usually give anti-seasickness shots to those who need them. Oh, and stay away from ships with a flat bottom (eg Fred Olsen 'Braemar', these cavitate and the noise is something else.

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