BLYTH - Answered a Question by Lomas (10 Jan 09 11:30)

You do need to have the letter signed by both parents, but you must also have it notarized. I would also highly recommend, JUST IN CASE (i hope this does not happen to you) having a letter signed by both parents AND notarized authorizing you to make any necessary medical decisions regarding your grandchild. Hopefully nothing happens, but just in case, you would need to have that letter notarized to give you the authority. You don't know a friendly or family solicitor if one exists !!

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Setter - replied to BLYTH (10 Jan 09 12:43)

Careful, Mr Blythe!!!Some of us are friendly enough and human enough(deapite all rumours!) to contribute to this site!!!Cynthia.

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BLYTH - replied to Setter (10 Jan 09 13:59)

Profuse apologies Cynthia. Maybe you could make some comments on their question which might be more helpful than my response .... Bill.

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hepburn - replied to BLYTH (10 Jan 09 14:38)

We typed up our own form giving us full durisdiction over the child including medical decisions...signed by both parents and Our local Church minister countersigned never cost a penny!!...We were never asked to show it!!!!!!! Audrey.

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Blyth - replied to hepburn (11 Jan 09 10:51)

If you never had to produce the form you can't really say it was OK. The real problem is if there is a medical issue and the doctor asks for the authorisation to administer whatever he requires to do before he proceeds then that is when the document will stand good or not. Hopefully this never happens but if they say the authorisation is insuffient the child is put at rsik now I know this is hopefully the exception but all the i's and t's have to be ticked. The advice I was picking up on the web and it might be wrong but the letter which has to be signed by both parents has to be done in the presence of a commissioner of oaths; a JP or a bonafida solicitor and all the birth certificates have to be presented at that time to the person who isa winessing the full document, but web advice is sometimes flawed by our interpretation of what we think it is saying, hopefully not stirring this issue out of proportion.

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Setter - replied to Blyth (11 Jan 09 14:51)

Bill, Your summary coincides with my interpretation . I must say that the cost involved in asking a Solicitor to witness the letter of authority and authenticate the accompanying documentation would be minimal---no more than the cost of having a passport application dealt with by your solicitor. (Can't give you any "estimate" I'm afraid ,because a) I am not allowed to! and b) being a prosecutor it's not something that comes my way!!!) I agree wholeheartedly that you would not want to have the document tried and found wanting---the consequences could in some circumstances literally prove fatal. my view is that in comparison with what you will be spending to take the children on a cruise this is a very minor item of expenditure and not one on which anyone should attempt to save money. One point to bear in mind for anyone following this procedure; the solicitor must see the parents sign--it's no good taking a signed letter to a solicitor and expecting him/her to witness the signatures. I know that seems very obvious, but you would be surprised , over more years in the law than I care to admit to, how many peolpe have expected just that!!!Cynthia.

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hepburn - replied to Setter (11 Jan 09 23:54)

Ring RCCL at Weybridge they will list who can sign....they include teacher, CHIROpodist!! If there is an emergency for a child do you really think there would be a delay?? A.

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Setter - replied to hepburn (13 Jan 09 17:09)

Yes, Mr/Mrs Hepburn, I do "really think there might be a delay"---especially on a ship with US Registered Medical officers! They receive training geared to avoiding the risk of legal action against them, to a far greater degree than do our UK medics. US Doctors are well aware that to perform a number. of procedures on a minor, they require parental consent and not obtaining that consent might well render them liable to legal action. Hence I would take no chances whatsoever!!!This, IMHO is not an area in which to try and save time or money by travelling without the requisite documentation. Let's face it, its hardly a serious imposition, is it? Cynthia.

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Blyth - replied to Setter (12 Jan 09 07:17)

Thanks Cynthia sometimes advice on the web is good and I agree any grandparents worth their salt should go about it in the correct manner .... Bill.

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BLYTH - Answered a Question by Lomas (10 Jan 09 12:18)

The other issue is they will need a passports if over 16 they need a 10 year passport !! Great idea taking the kids with you and they will have a womderful time.

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